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Mickleover Medical Centre Good

Reports


Review carried out on 11 December 2019

During an annual regulatory review

We reviewed the information available to us about Mickleover Medical Centre on 11 December 2019. We did not find evidence of significant changes to the quality of service being provided since the last inspection. As a result, we decided not to inspect the surgery at this time. We will continue to monitor this information about this service throughout the year and may inspect the surgery when we see evidence of potential changes.

Inspection carried out on 30 August 2017

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Mickleover Medical Centre on 30 August 2017. Overall, the practice is rated as good.

Our key findings across all the areas we inspected were as follows:

  • There was an open and transparent approach to safety and an effective system in place for reporting, recording and investigating significant events. We saw evidence of applied learning relating to these events.

  • Risks to patients were assessed and monitored on an on-going basis. This included infection control and staffing levels.

  • The practice had clearly defined and embedded systems in place to safeguard children and vulnerable adults.

  • Staff assessed patients’ needs and delivered care in line with current evidence based guidance. Staff had the skills, knowledge, and experience to deliver effective care and treatment.

  • The practice used clinical audit to drive quality improvement within the practice.

  • The practice worked effectively with the wider multi-disciplinary team to plan and deliver effective and responsive care for patients with complex care needs.

  • Feedback from patients about their care and interactions with staff was very positive. Patients said they were treated with compassion, dignity, and respect and they were involved in their care and decisions about their treatment.

  • The majority of patients said they could usually get an appointment when they needed one, with further improvements suggested. The practice continually sought to improve access for patients and systems were in place to monitor the demand for appointments.

  • The practice had good facilities and was well equipped to treat patients and meet their needs.

  • Information about services and how to complain was available. Improvements were made to the quality of care as a result of complaints and concerns.

  • The practice had a clear vision, which had quality and safety as its top priority. The strategy to deliver this vision was regularly reviewed and discussed with most staff.

  • There was a clear leadership structure and staff felt supported by management.

However there were areas of practice where the provider should make improvements:

  • Continue to ensure effective systems are in place to review, monitor and act upon patient experience data to continually drive service improvement. This includes access to the service.

  • Improve access to health checks for people with learning disabilities.

  • Embed identified improvements to ensure good communication across all staffing groups.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Inspection carried out on 7 and 16 December 2015

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Mickleover Medical Centre on 7 and 16 December 2015. The routine inspection was over two days to include a GP specialist advisor. Overall the practice is rated as good.

Our key findings across all the areas we inspected were as follows:

  • Feedback from patients was consistently positive about the care and treatment they received, and the way staff treated them. Patients were treated with kindness, dignity and respect.

  • Patients were able to access care and treatment when they needed it, and most people could access appointments in a way, and at a time that suited them. Access to telephone consultations with nurses had significantly increased, following the appointment of a second triage nurse.

  • Staff worked in partnership with other services to meet patients’ needs and support vulnerable individuals.

  • An effective system was in place for managing significant events, with a focus on openness and learning when things went wrong. Overall, comprehensive systems were in place to keep patients safe, although certain safeguarding processes required strengthening to protect people from abuse and the risk of harm

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  • Staff had the skills, knowledge and experience to deliver effective care and treatment.

  • The practice was well-led. There was a strong focus on continuous learning and improvement at all levels. The leadership and culture promotes the delivery of high- quality, compassionate care.

  • The practice actively sought feedback from staff and patients, which it acted on to improve the services.

  • Patients said they felt listened to and were able to raise concerns as the staff were approachable. Complaints were actively reviewed as to how they were managed, to ensure that appropriate learning and improvements had taken place.

We saw the following area of outstanding practice:

  • The practice had a large number of elderly and isolated patients. Several staff had set up regular tea and chat meetings at the practice to enable people to meet socially. The meetings also provided essential information. For example, fire officers from Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service recently attended a meeting to talk about fire safety at home. Staff held the meetings in their own time, and provided transport to enable people to attend.

However the provider needs to make the following improvements. Importantly the provider must:

  • Ensure all safeguarding systems are operated effectively including the recording and monitoring of vulnerable patients, to protect them from abuse and the risk of harm.

  • The areas where the provider should make improvement are:
  • Establish an effective system for managing informal concerns, to enable the practice to identify any patterns, and to ensure that appropriate improvements have taken place.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice