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Lucie Wedgwood Health Centre Good

Reports


Review carried out on 20 December 2019

During an annual regulatory review

We reviewed the information available to us about Lucie Wedgwood Health Centre on 20 December 2019. We did not find evidence of significant changes to the quality of service being provided since the last inspection. As a result, we decided not to inspect the surgery at this time. We will continue to monitor this information about this service throughout the year and may inspect the surgery when we see evidence of potential changes.

Inspection carried out on 24 May 2017

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We previously carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Lucie Wedgwood Health Centre on 27 September 2016. The overall rating for the practice was Good with requires improvement in providing safe services. The full comprehensive report from the 27 September 2016 inspection can be found by selecting the ‘all reports’ link for Lucie Wedgwood Health centre on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

This inspection was an announced focused inspection carried out on 24 May 2017 to confirm that the practice had carried out their plan to meet the legal requirements in relation to the breaches in regulations that we identified in our previous inspection on 27 September 2016. This report covers our findings in relation to those requirements and also additional improvements made since our last inspection.

Overall the practice is rated as Good.

Our key findings were as follows:

  • There was an effective system to ensure that patients who took medicines had a review by an appropriate clinician and consideration was given to the monitoring for side effects.

  • There was a system for obtaining satisfactory information about any physical or mental health condition that staff members may have which are relevant to the role they undertook.

  • The practice had recorded the action taken in response to all medicines and equipment alerts issued by external agencies.

  • The practice had reviewed the oxygen therapy equipment in use to ensure it could be easily deployed within the practice as required.

  • The practice had reviewed the method of storing and moving emergency medicines within the practice. The provider had obtained appropriate emergency medicine to treat possible complications associated with the insertion of specific intrauterine contraceptive devices.

We also saw the following best practice recommendations we previously made in relation to providing effective and responsive services had been actioned:

  • Discussions and actions taken about changes in clinical practice, for example national guidance, were now recorded during clinical meetings held.

  • Patients were advised of the escalation process should they not be happy with the outcome of their written complaint.

However, there was still one area of practice where the provider could make improvements.

The provider should:

  • Ensure the complaints procedure is readily accessible to patients.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Inspection carried out on 27/09/2016

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Lucy Wedgwood Health Centre on 27 September 2016. Overall the practice is rated as good.

Our key findings across all the areas we inspected were as follows:

  • There was an open and transparent approach to safety and an effective system in place for reporting and recording significant events.
  • Risks to patients were assessed and well managed, with the exception of those relating to monitoring some patients who took medicines to help control blood pressure.
  • Patients said they were treated with compassion, dignity and respect and they were involved in their care and decisions about their treatment.
  • Information about services and how to complain was available and easy to understand. Improvements were made to the quality of care as a result of complaints and concerns.
  • Patients said they found it easy to make an appointment with a named GP and there was continuity of care, with urgent appointments available the same day.
  • The practice had good facilities and was well equipped to treat patients and meet their needs.
  • There was a clear leadership structure and staff felt supported by management. The practice proactively sought feedback from staff and patients, which it acted on.

There were areas of practice where the provider needs to make improvements

Importantly, the provider must:

  • Implement an effective system to ensure that patients who take medicines have a review by a person with appropriate training and consideration is given to the monitoring for side effects.

  • Implement a system for obtaining satisfactory information about any physical or mental health condition that staff members may have which are relevant to the role they undertake.

The areas where the provider should make improvement are:

  • Record the action taken in response to medicines safety alerts.

  • Review the oxygen therapy equipment in use to ensure it could be deployed within the practice as required.

  • Review the method of storing and moving emergency medicines within the practice.

  • Record discussions about changes in clinical practice, for example national guidance in meeting minutes.

  • Include the avenues of escalation for patients in the written response to complaints. 

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Inspection carried out on 16 August 2013

During a routine inspection

On the day of our inspection we spoke with eight patients and four members of staff. Prior to the inspection we spoke with a spokesperson from the patient participation group (PPG) who was also a patient. One patient told us, �I would recommend the practice to anyone". Another patient told us, �The practice is brilliant. The service is very good and efficient and the doctors give really good advice".

We saw that patients' views and experiences were taken into account in the way the service was provided and that they were treated with dignity and respect. Patients experienced care and treatment that met their needs because there were enough qualified, skilled and experienced staff.

We saw that patients were protected against the risks associated with medicines because the practice had appropriate arrangements in place to manage medicines. The provider had effective systems in place to regularly assess and monitor the quality of service their patients received.