You are here

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 23 September 2016

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out a previous announced comprehensive inspection of this practice on 8 December 2016. Overall, we rated the practice as good. However, there was a breach of legal requirement. In particular, we found:

  • A continuing breach of a legal requirement regarding the lack of appropriate authorisation being place for healthcare staff to administer vaccines. Also, the arrangements for ensuring the security of prescriptions was not sufficiently rigorous.

After the comprehensive inspection the practice told us about what they would do to address the identified breach. We undertook this announced focussed inspection, on 18 August 2016, to check that the practice had followed their plan and to confirm that they now met the legal requirement. You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection by selecting the ‘all reports’ link for Beaumont Park Surgery on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

Our key findings were as follows:

The provider had complied with the requirement notice we set following our last inspection visit. In particular, we found:

  • The correct authorisation had been put in place to enable health care staff to administer vaccines.

  • Prescription pads and blank prescriptions were securely stored.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 23 September 2016

The practice is rated as good for providing safe services.

The provider had taken action to comply with the requirement notice we issued following our last inspection of the service. Action had been taken to make sure that the proper authorisations were in place, to allow healthcare staff to administer influenza vaccines. The arrangements for ensuring the security of prescriptions had been improved also.

Effective

Good

Updated 23 September 2016

Caring

Good

Updated 23 September 2016

Responsive

Good

Updated 23 September 2016

Well-led

Good

Updated 23 September 2016

Checks on specific services

People with long term conditions

Good

Updated 17 March 2016

The practice is rated as good for the care of people with long-term conditions.

Nationally reported QOF data, for 2014/15, showed the practice had performed well in relation to providing care and treatment for the clinical conditions commonly associated with this population group. Staff offered proactive, personalised care to meet the needs of patients with long-term conditions. The nursing team provided patients with access to a range of appointments and clinics, to help ensure they received the care and treatment they needed. Patients with long-term conditions were invited for an annual review, more often if required, where the focus was on patient education and the promotion of self-management of their health conditions. The healthcare assistants provided a range of diagnostic testing, prior to patients’ appointments with one of the practice nurses, to help reduce the number of times they had to attend the practice if they had more than one long-term condition.

Families, children and young people

Good

Updated 17 March 2016

The practice is rated as good for the care of families, children and young people.

Services had been planned to meet the needs of babies, families and younger patients. The practice provided a weekly walk-in clinic, which was supported by the attached health visitor. A full immunisation service was provided, and publicly available information showed the practice performed very well in this area. The two days a week triage service provided by the nurse practitioner (where patients could access both telephone advice or actual appointments) had a good level of usage by families and younger patients. Clinical staff provided a full range of contraceptive services to help patients access this service closer to home. All of the GPs had completed training to help them keep children safe. The practice’s attached health visitor attended the multi-disciplinary meetings which helped to promote the sharing of information about vulnerable and at-risk children and younger patients. There were systems in place to identify and follow up children who were at risk. Information was available for younger patients which explained how confidentiality worked, and informed them that they could talk to staff about any concerns they had.

Older people

Good

Updated 17 March 2016

The practice is rated as good for the care of older people.

Nationally reported Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) data, for 2014/15, showed the practice had, overall, performed well in relation to providing care and treatment for the clinical conditions commonly associated with this population group. Staff were committed to providing proactive, personalised care to meet the needs of older patients. All patients aged 75 years and older had access to a named GP, to help promote continuity of care to this age group. The needs of ‘very elderly’ patients were reviewed at the practice’s monthly clinical multi-disciplinary meetings. Older patients identified as having complex health and social care needs were referred to the community matron attached to the practice, as well as the local social services department and Age Concern. The practice had a rolling programme which involved staff proactively contacting any patient over 75 years of age who had had no contact with the practice for over 12 months. Staff were taking part in the CCG’s ‘New Models of Care’ initiative, aimed at co-ordinating and improving the care, treatment and support that older patients with complex medical needs received. The practice had performed very well with regards to protecting their older patients against seasonal influenza.

Working age people (including those recently retired and students)

Good

Updated 17 March 2016

The practice is rated as good for the care of working age people (including those recently retired and students.)

The practice was proactive in offering on-line services. For example, patients were able to book appointments and order repeat prescriptions on-line. Extended hours appointments were offered, to make it easier for families and working-age patients to obtain convenient appointments. Staff provided a full range of health promotion and screening that reflected the needs of this age group. Joint injections and a minor surgery service were provided, to help patients access services closer to home. Telephone consultations with a GP or nurse were also available, for those patients unable to attend a face-to-face appointment.

People experiencing poor mental health (including people with dementia)

Good

Updated 17 March 2016

The practice is rated as good for the care of people experiencing poor mental health (including people with dementia).

Data from the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) showed the practice had performed well in providing recommended care and treatment to patients with mental health needs. All patients with a diagnosed mental health condition were personally contacted by a member of the nursing team, who was also an experienced mental health professional, and invited to attend an annual health review. These reviews were carried out in patients’ own homes, if attending the surgery would create additional anxiety and distress. Systems were in place which supported staff to refer patients, so they could access the local psychological therapies programme and benefit from local social prescribing initiatives. The practice worked well with multi-disciplinary teams involved in the case management of people experiencing poor mental health, including those with dementia. Staff maintained a register of patients diagnosed with dementia so they could ensure they received the care and treatment they needed. Patients with dementia were identified on the practice’s clinical records system so staff were aware of their specific needs. The performance of the practice in relation to carrying out face-to-face reviews with patients who had dementia was comparable with other practices within the local CCG.

People whose circumstances may make them vulnerable

Good

Updated 17 March 2016

The practice is rated as good for the care of people whose circumstances may make them vulnerable.

Good arrangements had been made to meet the needs of vulnerable patients. The practice maintained a register of patients with learning disabilities and offered annual reviews to help them stay healthy. Systems were in place to protect vulnerable children. For example, the practice ‘flagged’ the records of at-risk children, to make sure staff knew who they were, so this could be taken into account during any contact with them at the surgery. Staff had received safeguarding training relevant to their role, and knew how to recognise signs of abuse in vulnerable adults and children. They also understood their responsibilities regarding information sharing and the documentation of safeguarding concerns. They knew how to contact relevant agencies in normal working hours and out-of-hours. The practice regularly worked with multi-disciplinary teams involved in the case management of vulnerable people. Staff gave vulnerable patients information and advice about how to access relevant support groups and voluntary organisations.