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Turning Point - Kent DCA Good

This service was previously registered at a different address - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 6 August 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Turning Point – Kent DCA is registered to provide personal care to people living in their own homes. Each person had a tenancy agreement and rented their accommodation. The service supports adults who have learning disabilities and physical disabilities. At the time of the inspection 27 people were receiving a personal care service.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People were encouraged to be a part of the local community; attending clubs, leisure centres, local shops, pubs and other local services. People were supported to make their own decisions and be as independent as possible.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

The service applied the principles and values of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These ensure that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes that include control, choice and independence.

The outcomes for people using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. People's support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent.

People were supported by a core staff team who had the right skills, knowledge and competencies. Regular agency staff were used to cover staffing hours for consistency. The registered manager had taken steps to improve staff retention and recruitment since the last inspection. Staff were recruited safely. Comprehensive risk assessments were in place and people were encouraged to take positive risks to support their wellbeing. Peoples medicines were managed safely, and lessons were learnt when things went wrong.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. Some documentation about restrictive practice did not include specific information about equipment used to keep people safe. The registered manager took action during the inspection to improve this. Staff were well supported and supervised and had a good understanding and knowledge of people and their needs. Peoples health was managed and supported well, and they made their own decisions about their food and drink.

Staff were caring and respectful of people and people appeared relaxed and happy with the staff that supported them. Peoples diversities were respected, and equality promoted. The registered manager organised forums and meetings where staff could discuss diversity and human rights.

People had detailed care and support plans. People, relatives and staff were involved in the assessment and delivery of care. People did a range of activities to suit their own personal preferences. End of life information was available in people’s care plans and this had been discussed where appropriate. A complaints procedure and policy were available, and complaints were responded to, to find a solution.

The service was well led, and the registered manager had a clear vison for the service which staff shared. Staff, people and other stakeholders were encouraged to provide feedback, so the service could improve. Quality assurance audits were conducted so service delivery could continue to improve. Staff understood their roles and responsibilit

Inspection carried out on 20 December 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection was carried out on the 20 December 2016 and was announced.

Turning Point – Kent DCA is registered to provide personal care to people living in their own homes. Each person had a tenancy agreement and rented their accommodation. The service supports adults who have learning disabilities and physical disabilities. At the time of the inspection 25 people were receiving a personal care service.

The service had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who is registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations, about how the service is run.

There was a culture of openness and honesty and people were supported to be as independent as possible. We visited a Christmas party organised by the provider and there was a relaxed atmosphere. Staff told us they had built up strong relationships with people and people were laughing and dancing throughout our visit.

Staff were responsive to people's needs and had supported them to go on holiday to places such as Benidorm and Kefalonia. The registered manager regularly organised competitions for everyone being supported to take part in. People had baked cakes and created a snowman and shared their work with each other.

Staff had sought advice and guidance from a variety of healthcare professionals to ensure people received the best care possible. People received support with a variety of health care conditions and staff supported one person to attend dialysis several times a week. People were supported to manage their medicines safely.

Any accidents and incidents were analysed to reduce the risk of them happening again. Risks relating to people's health, their behaviour and other aspects of their lives had been assessed and minimised where possible.

There was a contingency plan in place in the event of an emergency to ensure people still received the support they needed. Staff told us they could always contact a manager out of hours for advice or guidance if necessary.

There was enough staff to meet people's needs. Staff had been recruited safely. Staff had received induction, training, and supervision to support people effectively. There was an ongoing training programme to ensure that staff had the skills and knowledge to meet people's needs. Staff knew how to recognise and respond to abuse. The registered manager had reported any safeguarding concerns to the local authority and these had been investigated fully.

The Care Quality Commission is required by law to monitor the operation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). In supported living applications for DoLS are made to the Court of Protection. DoLS are a set of checks that are designed to ensure that a person who is deprived of their liberty is protected, and that this course of action is both appropriate and in the person's best interests. The registered manager had made some applications to the Court of Protection but these had not yet been authorised. Staff had up to date knowledge on the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and DoLS. They supported people to make their own choices where possible.

People were supported to eat healthily. They were involved in planning and preparing meals. Some people were fed through a special tube in their stomach and staff had received training to support them safely.

There was a complaints policy in place and people told us they knew how to complain if they needed to. Complaints were documented, investigated and responded to.

The registered manager was experienced in working with people with learning disabilities and providing person centred care. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) had been informed of any important events that occurred at the service, in line with current legislation.

The registered manager regularly carried out audits

Inspection carried out on 6 June 2013

During a routine inspection

People who could, told us that they were happy with their care. We saw documentation that demonstrated the service instilled person centred practice and worked with the people they supported rather than automatically doing things for them.. One person said "The help I get means that I can live independently and do the things I want to do". Another person said "I like my support workers, they help me a lot". Staff had received guidance from supervisors and their work was monitored to make sure that they continued to meet people's needs in a reliable way. This was being done through individual supervision meetings with supervisors, staff meetings and spot checks. We also saw that annual appraisals were carried out to promote professional development and reflect any regulatory and / or professional requirements. Staff told us that they felt supported and received sufficient training. This helped ensure that people's health and welfare needs were being met by a competent staff team. People told us that they were satisfied with the personal care they received and that their independence was encouraged.