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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 13 February 2019

Availl (Huntingdon) is a domiciliary care agency. It provides personal care to adults living in their own houses and flats.

Not everyone using Availl (Huntingdon) received the regulated activity of personal care. CQC only inspects the service being received by people provided with personal care, help with tasks related to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do we also take into account any wider social care provided.

This announced inspection took place from 28 January 2019 to 4 February 2019. At the time of this inspection, 14 people received the regulated activity, personal care.

This was the service’s first inspection.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were protected from avoidable harm by a staff team who were trained and confident to recognise and report any concerns. Staff assessed and minimised potential risks. The provider only employed staff after they had obtained satisfactory pre-employment checks. There were enough staff to ensure people’s needs were met safely and in a timely manner.

People were supported to manage their prescribed medicines by staff who were trained and had been assessed as competent to administer medicines. However, staff did not have clear guidance for all medicines prescribed to be administered, ‘when required’. The provider said they would review this and speak with people’s GP’s where necessary to ensure this information was available to staff. Staff followed the provider’s procedures to prevent the spread of infection and reduce the risk of cross contamination.

People’s care was planned and delivered in line with good practice guidance. Staff knew the people they cared for well and understood, and met, their needs. People received care from staff who were trained, well supported, and had the skills and knowledge to meet people’s assessed needs.

Staff supported people to have enough to eat and drink. People were assisted to have access to healthcare services to help maintain their health and well-being.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. The policies and systems in the service supported this practice. People were fully involved in making decisions about their care and support. People and their relatives were involved in the setting up and review of their or their family member’s individual support and care plans.

Staff knew people well, including their likes and dislikes and how to respond to their care needs effectively. Staff met people’s personal and health care needs. Care records provided staff with guidance on how to do this. Staff supported people to consider their end of life care to ensure they had the most comfortable, dignified, and pain-free a death as possible. Staff worked in partnership with other professionals to ensure that people received the best care possible.

People’s suggestions and complaints were listened to, investigated, and acted upon to help improve the service.

Staff liked working for, and were well supported by, the registered manager. The registered manager sought feedback about the quality of the service provided from people and acted to make improvements.

The provider’s monitoring process looked at systems throughout the service. The registered manager also carried out audits and quality monitoring checks to help identify shortfalls and to help drive forward improvements.

Further information is in the detailed findings below.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 13 February 2019

The service was safe.

People were protected from avoidable harm by a staff team trained and confident to recognise and report any concerns. Potential risks to people were assessed and minimised.

Staff were only employed after satisfactory pre-employment checks had been obtained. There were enough staff to ensure people�s needs were met safely.

People were supported to manage their prescribed medicines safely.

Effective

Good

Updated 13 February 2019

The service was effective.

Staff knew the people they cared for well and understood, and met, their needs. People received care from staff who were trained and well supported to meet people�s assessed needs.

Staff supported people with their eating and drinking requirements. People were assisted to have access to external healthcare services when needed.

Staff worked within and across organisations to deliver effective care and support. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives.

Caring

Good

Updated 13 February 2019

The service was caring.

Staff knew people well, including their likes and dislikes and how to respond to their care needs. People were fully involved in making decisions about their care and support.

People received information about the service.

Staff treated people with respect. They promoted and maintained people�s privacy, dignity, and independence.

Responsive

Good

Updated 13 February 2019

The service was responsive.

People�s individual needs were assessed and staff used this information to deliver personalised care that met people�s needs.

People�s suggestions and complaints were listened to and acted upon to reduce the risk of recurrence.

Staff supported people to have the most comfortable, dignified, and pain-free a death as possible.

Well-led

Good

Updated 13 February 2019

The service was well-led.

Staff upheld the values of the organisation, which included delivering high quality, personalised care to people in their own homes.

People, their relatives, and staff were encouraged to feed back on the quality of care provided. Audits and quality monitoring checks were carried out to help drive forward improvements.

Staff worked in partnership with other professionals to ensure that people received care that met their assessed needs.