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Inspection carried out on 10 August 2020

During an inspection looking at part of the service

9 Allenby Road is a residential care home providing personal and nursing care for up 4 people with learning disabilities. It provides respite care (short breaks) in one adapted building.

We found the following examples of good practice.

The service had signage outside the front door to alert visitors to restrictions on entering the building and the infection control measures they would need to take. Staff checked the temperature of all persons who entered the building and kept a record of these. Sanitising hand gel and disposable face masks were provided. A one-way system had been marked out around the premises to adhere to social distancing advice. There were 2m demarcation lines applied on the floor at an area where several rooms met, to remind people to stay in a particular zone until it was safe to move forward.

Personal protective equipment (PPE) was available in each person’s bedroom. Staff wore appropriate items of PPE when they assisted people with personal care and wore face masks at all times. The home had a good supply of all the items they needed.

Risks to staff had been assessed, taking into account health conditions and high risks associated with people from black, Asian and other ethnic minority backgrounds. None of the staff team needed to be off work for shielding reasons.

The premises were kept clean by staff. Surfaces were disinfected regularly and wiped down. A deep clean took place at night. People’s laundry was washed and stored separately to prevent cross-infection.

Staff and people who used the service were tested for Covid-19; latest swabs showed everyone tested negative.

Adjustments had been made to staff handovers and staff meetings. These were now held outside so staff could keep appropriate distance from each other. People who used the service could maintain distance from each other using different rooms for individual activities. There were also areas of the garden where people could maintain social distancing.

There was a detailed infection prevention and control policy in place which had been updated to take into account the risks from Covid-19. An infection control audit was carried out the day after our visit. This confirmed safe practices were in place. It was illustrated with photographs throughout to show the clean and tidy condition of the premises and the signage that had been put in place, as examples.

Inspection carried out on 5 March 2020

During a routine inspection

About the service

9 Allenby Road is a residential care home providing personal and nursing care for up 4 people with learning disabilities. It provides respite care (short breaks) in one adapted building. Two people were using the service at the time of our visit.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them. There was minimal signage to show the service is a respite care centre. Staff were also discouraged from wearing anything that suggested they were care staff when coming and going with people.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

Relatives were very complimentary of the service. One described it as “My lifeline,” others said “I couldn’t do without Allenby” and “I can’t praise them enough.” A person who used the service said “I enjoy coming here. I like staff. I enjoy the food.”

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

The service applied the principles and values of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These ensure that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes that include control, choice and independence.

The outcomes for people using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. People's support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent.

The service was managed well. There was a registered manager in place. Staff understood their responsibilities and worked together as a team. There were systems to monitor the quality of people’s care to make sure it was effective and safe.

There were enough staff to provide the support people needed. Staff were trained and supervised to make sure they met people’s needs effectively. They had been recruited using robust procedures.

People were supported with their healthcare needs. Their medicines were managed well. People were treated with dignity and respect. Written risk assessments were in place to identify and help reduce the likelihood of people experiencing injury or harm.

The premises had been well-maintained and provided a safe and comfortable environment for people. The garden had been re-landscaped to provide an attractive and accessible outdoor area.

Records, in particular residents’ meetings minutes, did not show how everyone present was involved in discussions or contributed to decisions. We have made a recommendation about recording the views of people who have communication difficulties.

Care plans were written to document people’s needs. It was not always clear if people had been asked about their choices and preferences for how they wished to be cared for. We have made a recommendation about clearly recording people’s choices and preferences.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

The last rating for this service was Good (report published 12/9/17).

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we

Inspection carried out on 25 August 2017

During a routine inspection

9 Allenby Road is a 4 bedroom, 24-hour respite service for younger and older adults with learning disabilities. Some people who use the service may also have additional complex physical disabilities or sensory needs. The service is located in a residential part of Maidenhead, Berkshire near a community day centre. Nursing care from agency registered nurses is provided at night to a small number of people who stay at the service.

The service was required to have a registered manager.

At the time of the inspection, there was a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

This was our first inspection of the service under the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. This was because the provider of the service changed in April 2017.

People who used the service were safe. They were protected from abuse and neglect during their stay. Staff ensured that care risks were appropriately assessed, documented and mitigated. Risks from the building and grounds were also satisfactorily managed. There were enough staff deployed to maintain safe support for people. Fit and proper persons were employed. People’s medicines were managed correctly.

Staff received appropriate support to perform their roles. The service was compliant with the Mental Capacity Act 2005. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. The policies and systems in the service supported this practice. We found there was enough food and drinks available and provided to people.

The service was caring. People’s dignity and privacy was respected. Confidential personal information was protected in line with the relevant legislation. People, where possible, and relatives were involved in care planning and review.

We found care plans were person-centred and contained appropriate details. People’s preferences, wishes and dislikes were identified and documented. Staff helped people to have an active life in the community. We made a recommendation about staff communication with people.

There was a good workplace culture at 9 Allenby Road. The management team and staff worked well together to provide good care to people who used the service. A small number of checks and audits were conducted to assess the safety and quality of care provided. At our inspection, we found the service met all regulatory requirements.