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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 30 November 2018

Hamilton House is a nursing home which provides accommodation, personal care and nursing care to 60 older people, some of whom were living with dementia. The home has three floors, with a passenger lift which gave access to all floors and all bedrooms had en-suite facilities. At the time of the inspection, 54 people were living at the home.

The inspection was unannounced and took place on 22 and 23 October 2018. There was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At our last inspection, in April 2018, we identified breaches of Regulations 12 and 17 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. Best practice guidance in the management of diabetes was not always followed and quality assurance systems were not always effective. At this inspection, we found action had been taken and there were no longer any breaches of Regulations.

This service has been in Special Measures. Services that are in Special Measures are kept under review and inspected again within six months. We expect services to make significant improvements within this timeframe. During this inspection the service demonstrated to us that improvements have been made. Therefore, this service is now out of Special Measures.

There was a registered manager in post at the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People felt safe living at the home. Staff knew how to identify, prevent and report abuse. They assessed and managed individual risks to people and risks posed by the environment effectively.

Arrangements were in place for the safe management of medicines. People received their medicines as prescribed. The home was clean and hygienic and staff followed best practice guidance to control the risk and spread of infection.

There were enough staff deployed to meet people’s needs. Appropriate recruitment procedures were in place and pre-employment checks were completed before staff started working with people.

People’s needs were met by staff who were competent, trained and supported in their role. Staff acted in the best interests of people and followed legislation designed to protect people’s rights and freedom.

People’s nutritional and hydration needs were met and they received appropriate support to eat and drink enough. Adaptations and improvements had been made to the home to make it supportive of the people living there.

People were supported to access other healthcare services when needed. Staff made information available to other healthcare providers to help ensure continuity of care.

People were cared for with kindness and compassion. Staff used supportive techniques to communicate effectively with people.

Staff protected people’s privacy and dignity. They encouraged people to remain as independent as possible and involved them in planning the care and support they received.

People’s needs were met in a personalised way. Each person had a care plan that was centred on their needs and reviewed regularly. Staff empowered people to make choices and responded promptly when people’s needs changed.

People had access to a wide range of activities based on their individual interests, including regular access to the community. They knew how to make a complaint and felt able to raise concerns.

Staff took account of people’s end of life wishes and preferences. They supported people to remain comfortable and p

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 30 November 2018

The service was safe.

Staff understood their safeguarding responsibilities and knew how to identify, prevent and report abuse.

Individual and environmental risks to people were managed effectively.

There were enough staff deployed to meet people’s needs. Recruitment practices helped ensure only suitable staff were employed.

Medicines were managed safely and people received their medicines as prescribed.

There were appropriate systems in place to protect people by the prevention and control of infection.

Effective

Good

Updated 30 November 2018

The service was effective.

People received effective care from staff who were competent, suitably trained and appropriately supported in their roles.

People’s nutritional needs were met.

Staff acted in the best interests of people and followed legislation designed to protect people’s rights.

People were supported to access to other health professionals when needed. When people were admitted to hospital, staff ensured key information accompanied the person to help ensure continuity of care.

The environment had been adapted to meet the needs of people living at the home. Staff made appropriate use of technology to support people.

Caring

Good

Updated 30 November 2018

The service was caring.

Staff treated people with kindness and compassion. They used appropriate techniques to communicate with people.

Staff explored people’s cultural and diversity needs and supported them to follow their faith.

Staff protected people’s privacy and respected their dignity.

People were encouraged to be as independent as possible and were involved in planning the care and support they received.

Responsive

Good

Updated 30 November 2018

The service was responsive.

Care and support were centred on the individual needs of each person. Care plans were reviewed regularly and staff responded promptly when people’s needs changed.

People were empowered to make as many choices as possible. They were supported to access a wide range of activities based on their individual interests.

Staff knew how to support people to receive compassionate end of life care that helped ensure their comfort and dignity.

People knew how to raise concerns and there was an appropriate complaints procedure in place.

Well-led

Good

Updated 30 November 2018

The service was well-led.

There were effective quality assurance systems to assess, monitor and improve the service.

There was a clear management structure in place. Staff were organised in their work and communicated effectively with one another.

There was an open and transparent culture. People were consulted about the way the service was run.

Positive links had been developed with the community to the benefit of people.