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Old Gates Care Home Requires improvement

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 26 February 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service: Old Gates Care Home provides accommodation in three units, for up to 90 people who need either nursing or personal care and support. These units are Cherry, Holly and Rowan. Care and support for people living with a dementia is provided in Rowan. There were a total of 75 people using the service on the days of our inspection.

People’s experience of using this service: People’s experience of Old Gates varied depending on the unit on which they lived.

We were unable to visit Rowan unit due to an outbreak of diarrhoea and vomiting. However, staff who had recently worked on this unit told us improvements had been made since the last inspection and the quality of care people received was good. One staff member commented, “It’s fun on Rowan. You go home smiling.”

People on Cherry unit, which provided care for people who did not require nursing care, was generally good. However, people on this unit told us there were not always enough staff to respond to their needs in a timely manner. During the inspection, we observed a lively atmosphere on Cherry unit with people engaged in conversation and activities.

Our observations, discussions with staff and review of records on Holly unit showed people’s quality of life was adversely affected by staffing levels. People on this unit had complex nursing needs and required two staff to meet their needs. Many people who lived in this unit remained in bed during both days of the inspection and we saw limited positive interactions between staff and people they were caring for. Staff told us they did not have the time to provide people with the care they needed. People’s medicines on this unit were not always safely managed.

Rating at last inspection: This was the first inspection since a new provider had taken over the running of the service on 15 December 2017.

Why we inspected: This comprehensive inspection was prompted by information of concern we had received from the local authority quality team and local clinical commission group following their visits to the service in January 2019.

Enforcement: We identified three breaches of the Health and Social Care Act (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014; these related to staffing levels and the support and training staff received, the unsafe handling of medicines and the lack of robust systems to monitor the quality and safety of the service. Information relating to the action the provider needs to take can be found at the end of this report. Full information about the Care Quality Commission's regulatory response to the more serious concerns found at inspections and appeals is added to reports after any representations or appeals have been concluded.

Follow up: We will continue to monitor the service to ensure that people receive safe, compassionate, high quality care. Further inspections will be planned for future dates. We will follow up on the breach of regulations at our next inspection.

Inspection carried out on 14 June 2017

During a routine inspection

This was an unannounced inspection which took place on 14 and 15 June 2017.

Old Gates Care Home provides accommodation in three units, for up to 90 people who need either nursing or personal care and support. These units are Cherry, Holly and Rowan. Care and support for people living with a dementia is provided in Rowan. There were a total of 61 people using the service on the days of our inspection.

We had previously inspected this service in February 2017 when we identified five breaches of the Health and Social Care Act (HSCA) 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulation 2014. These related to staffing arrangements on the unit for people living with a dementia, recruitment processes which were not sufficiently robust, a lack of effective systems to ensure people received safe and appropriate care, limited evidence of person centred activities particularly for people living with a dementia and a lack of effective leadership in the service.

Following the inspection in February 2017, the provider wrote to us to tell us the action they intended to take to ensure they met all the relevant regulations by the end of May 2017. This inspection was undertaken to check whether the required improvements had been made.

Since the last inspection the manager had registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). A registered manager is a person who has registered with CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The registered manager was supported in the running of the service by a clinical services manager and three unit managers.

Staff had been safely recruited and there were sufficient numbers of staff on duty to meet the needs of people in a timely manner. People who used the service told us staff were kind, caring and respectful; this was confirmed by our observations during the inspection. Our discussions with staff showed they had a good understanding of people’s needs and were committed to providing high quality care. We saw that people were supported to maintain their independence as much as possible.

People told us they felt safe in Old Gates. Policies and procedures were in place to guide staff about the correct action to take should they witness or suspect abuse. All the staff we spoke with told us they had completed training in safeguarding adults. They told us they would have no hesitation in reporting any concerns and were confident they would be listened to.

We noted that 10 of the 12 care records we reviewed contained risk assessments to help staff mitigate against all identified risks. However, we found staff had failed to report and record an incident of aggressive behaviour exhibited by one person. This meant appropriate risk assessments had not been put in place to protect both the individual concerned and staff; this situation was rectified by the clinical services manager by the second day of the inspection. In addition, another person’s care records documented four recent incidents of aggressive behaviour. However, there were no risk management plans in place to guide staff on the appropriate action to take in the event of future incidents occurring. This meant people might not receive safe and appropriate care.

Systems were in place to help ensure the safe handling of medicines. Staff responsible for the administration of medicines had received training for this role. The competence of staff to administer medicines safely was regularly assessed.

People were cared for in a safe and clean environment. Procedures were in place to prevent and control the spread of infection. We observed these in practice during the inspection as staff effectively controlled an outbreak of diarrhoea and vomiting which had occurred on one of the units.

Regular checks were made to help ensure the safety of the premises and

Inspection carried out on 15 February 2017

During a routine inspection

This was an unannounced inspection which took place on 15 and 16 February 2017. There had been a change to the legal entity providing the service in February 2017. This was the first inspection since the new provider had taken over the running of the service.

Old Gates Care Home provides accommodation in three units, for up to 90 people who need either nursing or personal care and support. These units are Cherry, Holly and Rowan. Care and support for people living with a dementia is provided in Rowan. There were a total of 72 people using the service on the days of our inspection.

The service did not have a registered manager in place. A new manager had been in post at the service since January 2017. They told us they intended to apply to register with CQC as the manager of the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The manager was supported in the running of the service by a newly appointed clinical services manager and three unit managers.

During this inspection we identified five breaches of the Health and Social Care Act (HSCA) 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulation 2014. These related to staffing arrangements on the unit for people living with a dementia, recruitment processes which were not sufficiently robust, a lack of effective systems to ensure people received safe and appropriate care, limited evidence of person centred activities particularly for people living with a dementia and a lack of effective leadership in the service. You can see what action we have told the provider to take at the back of the full version of the report.

We identified a lack of leadership in the service particularly on Rowan and Cherry units. Staff were not appropriately deployed on Rowan unit to ensure people visiting or living and working in the unit were properly protected; this resulted in a number of serious incidents being witnessed by the inspection team on the second day of the inspection. Risk assessments and risk management plans did not contain sufficient information to guide staff on how best to support people whose behaviour might challenge others. Risk assessments were not in place for a person who was identified as being at risk of falling and choking; this meant staff might not be aware of the care the person required to minimise these risks. We also found that changes in people’s behaviour had not always triggered a review of relevant risk assessments and risk management plans; this meant staff did not always have up to date information about the best way to respond to people’s needs.

We found evidence that people who used the service, particularly those on Rowan unit, had not always received their medicines as prescribed.

The recruitment process in the service needed to be improved in order to properly protect people from the risk of unsuitable staff. Additional checks had not always been undertaken when staff had worked previously with vulnerable adults or children to ascertain why their employment in that service had ended. Records did not show that gaps in one applicant’s employment history had been explored.

People on Holly and Cherry units were generally satisfied with the range of activities available to them. We saw that, although objects were available for staff to use on Rowan unit to interact with people who used the service, none of these were utilised when people became distressed or exhibited behaviour which might challenge others. There was a lack of individualised and person centred activities on this unit which meant the well-being of people who used the service was not always promoted.

People who were able to express a view told us they felt safe in Old Gates and that staff were always kind