You are here

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 5 February 2020

During an inspection looking at part of the service

About the service

Court House Nursing Home provides personal and nursing care. The provider is registered to accommodate up to 60 people. The home was split into three units; two were for older people and one for younger adults. Midsummer Unit provided accommodation for 25 older people. Beacon Unit provided accommodation for 16 older people. The third unit, Holly Bush Unit provided accommodation for 19 younger, physically disabled adults. On the days of our inspection there were 49 people living at the home.

People we spoke with said they felt safe living at the home. Staff recognised the signs of abuse and understood what action they should take if they had any concerns. Risk assessments were in place for staff to follow to keep people safe from harm.

People were supported to have their medicines safely and checks were undertaken to ensure these were administered as prescribed.

Staffing levels were reviewed by the registered manager to ensure staff could meet the changing needs of people living at the home.

The risk of infections and accidental harm was reduced, as staff used the knowledge and equipment provided to do this.

The provider and the registered manager checked on the safety and quality of the care provided to people.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection (and update)

The last rating for this service was Good (published 16 January 2020)

Why we inspected

To assure ourselves the service was meeting people’s needs, that staff had the necessary skills and experience and the management processes were effective we completed a focused inspection. We reviewed the key questions of Safe and Well Led only.

Inspection carried out on 15 October 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Court House Nursing Home provides personal and nursing care. The provider is registered to accommodate up to 60 people. The home was split into three units; two were for older people and one for younger adults. Midsummer Unit provided accommodation for 25 older people. Brecon Unit provided accommodation for 16 older people. The third unit, Holly Bush Unit provided accommodation for 19 younger physically disabled adults. On the days of our inspection there were 57 people living at the home.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People we spoke with said they felt safe living at the home. Staff recognised the signs of abuse and understood what action they should take if they had any concerns. Risk assessments were in place for staff to follow to keep people safe from harm

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People were supported to have their medicines safely and checks were undertaken to ensure these were administered as prescribed.

The risk of infections and accidental harm was reduced, as staff used the knowledge and equipment provided to do this.

People felt staff were well trained.

Staff spoke affectionately about the people they cared for. People were confident to request support and reassurance from staff when they wanted this, and staff took time to provide this in the ways people preferred.

The views of people, relatives and other health and social care professionals were considered when people’s care was assessed, planned and reviewed, so people’s needs continued to be met, and based on people’s preferences.

Procedures were in place to take any learning from complaints and to further improve people’s care.

People’s wishes for their care at the end of their lives had been planned and the views of their relatives considered.

The registered manager and provider checked the quality of the care provided and encouraged suggestions from people and staff to improve people’s care further.

The registered manager kept up to date with best practice developments, so they could develop the care provided further.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

The last rating for this service was Good (report published 18 April 2017).

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Inspection carried out on 9 March 2017

During a routine inspection

We undertook an inspection on 9 and 10 March 2017. This was an unannounced inspection.

Court House Care Home provides personal and nursing care. The provider is registered to accommodate up to 60 people. The home was split into three units; two were for older people and one for younger adults. Midsummer Unit provided accommodation for 25 older people. Beacon Unit provided accommodation for 16 older people. The third unit, Holly Bush Unit provided accommodation for 19 younger adults. On the day of our inspection there were 57 people living at the home.

There was a registered manager for this service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Registered providers and registered managers are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People we spoke with said they felt safe at the home. Relatives told us their family members were supported in a safe way. Staff we spoke with recognised the different types of abuse. There were systems in place to guide staff in reporting any concerns. Staff were knowledgeable about how to manage people’s individual risks, these focussed on encouraging their independence in a safe way. People were supported to receive their medicines by staff that were trained and knew about the risks associated with people’s medicines.

Staff had up to date knowledge and training to support people living at the home. Staff always ensured people agreed to the support they received. The management team ensured people were supported in the least restrictive way and were assisted to make their own decisions where possible. People told us they enjoyed the food at the home and were encouraged to make their own choices. They explained that they were supported to make their own decisions and be as independent as they could. People and their relatives told us staff would access health professionals as soon as they were needed.

People said the staff and the management team were caring and always treated them with dignity and respect. People were supported in a way that respected their wishes and staff were aware of peoples individual needs and preferences. Relatives told us they were involved as part of the team to support their family member. Staff understood people’s human rights and adapted their communication skills to ensure people understood them. People said their cultural needs were met.

The staff team were adaptable to changes in peoples’ needs and knew people well enough to recognise when additional support was needed. All the people we spoke with and the feedback collected by the registered manager and provider said people were happy to be living at the home. People and their relatives knew how to raise complaints and the registered manager had arrangements in place to ensure people were listened to and appropriate action taken. Staff were involved in regular meetings and one to one time with the management team to share their views and concerns about the quality of the service.

The registered manager and the provider had systems in place to monitor the quality of care provided. The registered manager ensured there was a culture of openness and inclusion for people using the service and staff.