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Medacs Healthcare - Leicester

Overall: Good

7 Westleigh Business Park, Winchester Avenue, Blaby, Leicester, Leicestershire, LE8 4EZ (0116) 264 3922

Provided and run by:
Medacs Healthcare PLC

All Inspections

5 May 2022

During a monthly review of our data

We carried out a review of the data available to us about Medacs Healthcare - Leicester on 5 May 2022. We have not found evidence that we need to carry out an inspection or reassess our rating at this stage.

This could change at any time if we receive new information. We will continue to monitor data about this service.

If you have concerns about Medacs Healthcare - Leicester, you can give feedback on this service.

29 October 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Medacs Healthcare-Leicester provides personal care to adults with a variety of needs living in their own homes. This included older people, people with a sensory impairment, people with physical disabilities, people living with dementia and younger adults. At the time of the inspection there were 148 people using the service.

Not everyone who used the service received personal care. CQC only inspects where people receive personal care. This is help with tasks related to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do we also consider any wider social care provided.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People told us they were well cared for and felt safe with the staff providing their support. Risk assessments were current. Accidents and incidents were recorded and followed up by management. All staff and management had a clear understanding of safeguarding. Medicines were managed safely. Staff knew how to reduce the spread of infection.

Recruitment and selection processes were in place to ensure the service employed staff committed to person-centred care. There were sufficient staff to provide care for people. Staff received induction and training relevant to their role. Regular supervision and team meetings were in place.

People’s care plans were holistic and individual to them. Care plans were reviewed and updated on a regular basis. Staff supported people in the least restrictive way possible and people were able to exercise choice and remain in control of their lives. The service was committed in policy and practice to providing a supportive service which promoted wellbeing.

Staff cared for people in a respectful way that promoted their dignity, privacy and independence. Staff had formed good working relationships with people which promoted mutual respect. People had a voice in their care. The service was committed to continual improvement and sought regular feedback from people and their relatives. People felt confident to raise concerns with the service.

The registered manager was committed to delivering safe and high-quality care. Quality Assurance processes and personnel were in place to analyse feedback and to audit staff competencies and performance. Staff were encouraged to bring forward ideas on service improvement. The management team supported staff to improve their skills and knowledge. There was a commitment by management to continuous improvement.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

The last rating for this service was Good (published 2 May 2017).

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

16 February 2017

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 16 February 2017 and was announced. The provider was given 48 hours’ notice of the inspection. This was because the location provides a domiciliary care service. We needed to be sure that the registered manager would be available to speak with us.

Medacs Healthcare-Leicester provides personal care to adults with a variety of needs living in their own homes. This included older people, people with a sensory impairment, people with physical disabilities, people living with dementia and younger adults. At the time of the inspection there were 140 people using the service. On 7 November 2016 Medacs Healthcare – Leicester started to provide care packages to people who had previously received care from other care providers as part of a new contract. This meant that they had a large number of care calls in one geographic area where they had not worked prior to this date. As part of this process Medacs Healthcare – Leicester transferred staff from other providers to be employed by them. Since this date we had an increased number of concerns about the service raised directly with us. This prompted the inspection to be brought forwards.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were protected from the risk of harm at the service because staff had undertaken training to recognise and respond to safeguarding concerns. They had a good understanding about what safeguarding meant and how to report it. The provider dealt with accidents and incidents appropriately and reviewed these to try and prevent reoccurrences. Risks to people’s well-being had been assessed.

We found there were enough staff to support people safely during our visit. However, we found that in November when the provider had started to support people in a new geographic area there had been times when people had not had all of their care calls. People told us that had improved. Staff had been checked for their suitability before starting work.

People’s medicines were handled safely and were given to them in accordance with their prescriptions. The provider agreed to make sure that all medicines that were to be given were written down individually. We found that guidance for staff when to give medicines that were as and when required was not in place. The registered manager agreed that this would be developed.

Staff received appropriate support through an induction and regular supervision. There was an on-going training programme to provide and update staff on safe ways of working.

People chose their own food and drink and were supported to follow a specific diet if this was required. Staff prompted people to contact healthcare services when required to promote their well-being.

People were asked for their consent before they were supported. People were encouraged to make decisions about their care.

People felt that they did not always receive care from the same staff team. Staff told us that they were beginning to work more regularly with the same people to improve this.

People received support from staff who usually showed kindness and compassion. Their dignity and privacy was protected.

People knew how to make a complaint. The provider had a complaints policy in place that was available for people and their relatives. Some people felt that their complaints were not always responded to.

People felt that staff were sometimes late and they were not always contacted about this when it happened. Some people felt rushed while they were receiving support.

People and their relatives had contributed to the planning and review of their support. People had care plans that included information about their likes, dislikes and history. Staff knew how to support people based on their preferences and how they wanted to be supported. People were supported to be as independent as they could be.

The service was led by a registered manager and a manager who understood their statutory responsibility to report to CQC and other agencies significant events that occurred within the service.

Systems were in place which assessed and monitored the quality of the service. The regional operations manager told us that a new audit to review the whole service was to be implemented. People and their relatives were asked for feedback about the service.

14 January 2016

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 14 January 2016 and was announced. The provider was given 48 hours’ notice of the inspection because the location provides a domiciliary care service and we needed to be sure that the registered manager would be available to speak with.

The service provided personal care to adults with a variety of needs living in their own homes. This included people living with dementia, physical disabilities, older people, people with learning disabilities and younger adults. At the time of our inspection there were approximately 60 people using the service who received support that included regulated activities.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us that they felt safe when staff supported them.

When people started to use the service a care plan was developed that included information about their support needs, likes, dislikes, history and preferences. This meant that staff had the relevant information to meet people’s needs.

Risk assessments were in place which set out how to support people in a safe manner. The service had safeguarding and whistleblowing procedures in place. Staff were aware of their responsibilities in these areas.

People told us that staff arrived on time for appointments to support them. We saw that records showed that stayed for the time they were supposed to.

People were supported to take their medicines by care workers who had received training in medicines management.

Care workers were supported through training and supervision to be able to meet the cares needs of people they supported. They undertook an induction programme when they started to work at the service.

Staff told us that they sought people’s consent prior to providing their care. Where people were believed to not have the capacity to make specific decisions the service followed the correct procedures in line with the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

Staff developed caring relationships with people and understood people’s needs and preferences.

People were involved in decisions about their support. They told us that staff treated them with respect.

People and staff felt the manager was approachable and would listen to them.

Questionnaires were carried out with people who used the service to monitor the quality of the service. People were not given feedback to tell them what would change as a result of the questionnaire.

The provider carried out monitoring of the quality of the service. Actions plans were developed however progress against these was not monitored.

29 July 2013

During a routine inspection

The people who used the service and their relatives told us the agency provided good care. One person said, 'The service is fantastic. All the staff are skilled and they don't make mistakes and I've never had to pull anyone up for anything.' Another commented, 'The staff are funny they make me laugh. I was shy at first but once I got to know them I was fine. I get on well with my carer because we both like the same music.'

People said they felt safe using the agency and trusted the carers. They also knew what to do if they had a complaint. One person told us, 'If I wasn't happy about anything I'd ring my care co-coordinator and arrange to meet with her to discuss it.' Another person commented, 'My care co-ordinator is amazing. If there's a problem or issue she sorts it out straight away.'

People told us they were pleased with the staff the agency supplied. One person said, 'The staff are brilliant and very accommodating. They have become part of our family.' Another person commented, 'The agency does its best to give me regular carers and they are always nice and respectful.'

People said they were regularly asked to comment on their care. One person said, 'Medacs staff phone up or come and see us. They want to know if we're happy with the staff and that everything's alright.' Another person commented, 'We get an annual survey which you can fill in to rate the agency.'

16 November 2012

During a routine inspection

People said the care the agency provided was good. One person told us, 'I am satisfied in every way with Medacs. The care is excellent.' A relative commented, 'The agency provides fantastic care ' I can't praise them enough ' they deserve five gold stars.'

People told us they felt safe using the agency and trusted the carers. They also knew what to do if they had a complaint. One person said, 'If I had a complaint I would contact Medacs and discuss it with them.' A relative told us, 'If I had a problem with the service I would tell the carers as I know them well.'

People said they liked the staff team and tended to have the same carers. One person told us, 'I have no problems with the staff. They are very rarely late and always pleasant and helpful.' Another person commented, 'I usually get the same people which is good because I don't have to keep explaining to new people what I need.'

People told us the agency contacted them regularly to get their views on the service. One person said, 'Medacs phone or email me every few weeks to see how I'm getting on and if I'm happy with the care.' A relative commented, 'Medacs staff are always ringing me and coming round to make sure everything's alright. They are brilliant.'