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Archived: Right at Home (Sutton & Epsom)

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Reports


Inspection carried out on 4 June 2014

During a routine inspection

We considered our inspection findings to answer questions we always ask; Is the service caring? Is the service responsive? Is the service safe? Is the service effective? Is the service well led?

Below is a summary of what we found. The summary is based on looking at records and from speaking with four people using the service and the relatives of four others. We also spoke with the provider and the registered manager and met with office based staff.

If you want to see the evidence supporting our summary please read the full report.

Is the service safe?

People we spoke with told us they, or their relatives, were safe. One person said, “I feel most confidently that I am safe. If I didn’t feel comfortable with the carers I would tell them so, straight away.” Another person told us, “I feel perfectly safe with my carers.”

Staff had assessed potential risks to people’s safety, health and welfare in their homes. There was appropriate guidance for staff on how to manage these risks to keep people safe from harm when they received care and support.

Records kept by the service were accurate and up to date which meant staff had access to the most up to date information about people. Records were kept securely so people could be assured their personal information was not accessible to anyone who had no right to see this.

Staff received regular training in infection control and had access to personal protective equipment. This gave people using the service assurance staff knew how to maintain good standards of cleanliness and personal hygiene to reduce the risk of cross infection.

Senior staff planned staffing levels in advance to ensure there were enough staff to meet the needs of people using the service.

CQC monitors the operation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. The service had policies and procedures in relation to the Mental Capacity Act and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards although no applications had needed to be submitted. Relevant staff had been trained to understand when an application should be made and in how to submit one. This means that people will be safeguarded as required.

Is the service effective?

People using the service and their relatives were involved in planning and developing their care and support. Their views and specific needs were taken into account, when staff planned their care.

Senior staff regularly reviewed people’s care and support needs and risk assessments so that staff had the most up to date information about their care and support needs.

People told us staff demonstrated a good understanding and awareness of their care and support needs. One person said, “They deliver care to a good standard.” Another person told us, “I get the care that I agreed with them, sometimes more so.”

Is the service caring?

The majority of people we spoke with told us people were cared for by kind and attentive staff. One person said, “The carers are very good indeed. I’ve had the same ones for a long time and they know me very well. They are like friends now.” Another person told us, “They are very caring people and won’t leave people if they are in distress or need extra time.” Another person said, ““Can’t fault them. They come in the morning, and they do anything I need. They’re great.”

Is the service responsive?

Staff were responsive to any changes and deterioration in people’s general health and well-being. They took appropriate action to ensure relatives and relevant healthcare professionals were kept informed about any changes so that people got the medical care and attention they needed. One person said, “My regular carer came once and saw I wasn’t myself and got in touch with my doctor straight away.” A relative told us, “If they’re ever concerned about something they will phone you straight away and let you know.”

All the people we spoke with told us they were comfortable raising any issues and concerns with senior staff who dealt with these quickly. One person told us following a complaint they had made, they had noticed an improvement in the quality of care they received.

Is the service well-led?

The service used the views and experiences of people using the service to assess and monitor the quality of service provided. They sought people’s suggestions for improvements and made changes that people wanted or needed. They took appropriate action to address any issues or concerns about service quality.

Senior staff demonstrated a good understanding and awareness of how regular audits and checks improved the service that people experienced.

Inspection carried out on 2 July 2013

During a routine inspection

We spoke with some of the people using the service and their representatives to find out what people thought about the quality of care and support they received. One person said, “The service is excellent. Staff are excellent. I can’t fault them.” Another person told us, “I’ve got excellent people looking after me, which is great.” A representative of one of the people using the service said, “I’m actually very pleased with the service. We’ve had continuity that we needed and we’re very happy with the carers we have.” Another representative told us, “They are accommodating and carers are enthusiastic.”

The service carried out detailed assessments with people and their representatives to identify their specific care and support needs. People were able to state their choices and preferences for how they were looked after. The service had used this information to develop plans to provide the care and support people needed. We saw from care plans we looked at there was detailed information for staff about how to meet people’s care and support needs.

There were effective procedures in place to recruit and appoint staff and appropriate checks were made about staff’s suitability to work for the service.

People were asked for their views about the service and had been provided opportunities to make suggestions. We saw the service made changes and improvements that people wanted and responded proactively to complaints when these had arisen, to resolve them.

Inspection carried out on 1 May 2012

During a routine inspection

We spoke with people who use the service and their representatives to find out what people thought about the quality of care and support they received. One person said they were ‘delighted’ with the service they received as ‘they did exactly what I wanted’. People told us they had been able to choose the level of care and support they wanted and were involved in developing their care plans. One person told us ‘It was very much up to me with the facts they presented what the options were for care and support’. Another person told us ‘My care plan is on the table in front of me and I’ve been involved with it from the beginning’.

People felt safe and well looked after. One person told us ‘I feel safe at home’. Another person said about their relative ‘I haven’t got any fears and worries. I go out with confidence that they are fine’. People felt that staff that looked after them or their relative were well trained, friendly and competent. One person said ‘Staff are very helpful. I cannot speak highly enough of them’. Another person told us ‘they make sure I’m moving safely around the house’. Another person said ‘they are kind and attentive and I rate them well’. People told us their views about the service were sought and acted upon. One person said ’They have popped in to see me to check if there was anything I needed and to make sure that things are going ok’. Another person told us ‘The opportunity is there all the time to give feedback and to talk to someone’