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Cleeve Court Community Resource Centre Requires improvement

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

We are carrying out a review of quality at Cleeve Court Community Resource Centre. We will publish a report when our review is complete. Find out more about our inspection reports.

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Requires improvement

Updated 11 August 2018

The inspection was unannounced and took place on 27 June 2018. At the last inspection the service had not stored medicines for disposal safely which was a breach of the Health and Social Care Act (HSCA) 2008. At this inspection we found these were now stored safely, however, there were other shortfalls in the safe management of medicines.

Cleeve Court Community Resource Centre is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

Cleeve Court Community Resource Centre accommodates up to 45 people across two separate floors Lansdown View and Kelston Rise, each of which have separate adapted facilities. The service specialises in providing care to people living with dementia. At the time of our inspection there were 42 people living at the service.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At the previous inspection we found medicines for return or disposal were not stored safely. This had been rectified and these medicines were now stored safely, however, we found shortfalls in the recording of medicines. This was a breach of regulation.

The provider had not always notified us of all the incidents that occurred at the service. This was a breach of regulation.

Staff at the service were trained and supervised and were positive about the care they delivered. However, morale was mixed due to changes in the staff contract.

People and their relatives were complimentary about the care delivered by staff. The service delivered care using the Butterfly Model which focussed on people’s emotional well-being. Staff were warm, caring and respectful in their interactions with people. It was evident people were at ease and felt safe with staff. Relatives told us, and compliments received by the service confirmed, that they had been happy with the way their loved ones had been cared for.

Staff treated people with warmth and kindness. They respected people’s privacy and dignity and supported people to be as independent as possible.

The environment had been adapted and decorated to support the needs of people living with dementia. Signage was clear and easy to understand. Different areas of the service had been decorated to give a homely feel and furnished with familiar objects for people to see. The service had received a number of awards previously for the care delivered.

People were supported to eat and drink enough, and alternatives were available if they did not like the meal choices. Drinks were available throughout the day.

People’s health care needs were met; the service had good links with the GP, district nurses and the community mental health team. There was positive feedback about the service from these professionals.

We found one breach of the Health and Social Care Act and one breach of the Registration Regulations 2009. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of the report

Inspection areas

Safe

Requires improvement

Updated 11 August 2018

The service was not always safe.

Medicines were not always managed safely.

The provider did not always follow their falls assessment policy.

People were protected from the risk of infection.

Effective

Good

Updated 11 August 2018

The service was effective.

Staff followed best practice in supporting people living with dementia.

Staff received training and supervision.

People were supported to eat and drink enough.

Staff knew the principles of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) and sought consent from people providing care and support.

Caring

Good

Updated 11 August 2018

The service was caring.

Staff were warm and compassionate and focussed on people’s well-being.

People and their relatives felt cared for and well-looked after.

People’s privacy, dignity and independence was respected.

Responsive

Good

Updated 11 August 2018

The service was responsive.

People received individualised care.

People and relatives were confident that if they had any concerns they would be listened to.

People received caring and compassionate care when they approached the end of their life.

Well-led

Requires improvement

Updated 11 August 2018

The service was not always well-led.

The provider’s systems and processes had not always identified shortfalls in the recording of medicines.

The provider had not informed us of all incidents as required by the regulations.

People and their relatives were complimentary about the service.

The service had been nominated for, and won, awards for the standard of dementia care