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Inspection carried out on 10 May 2018

During a routine inspection

Woodmancote Manor is a residential care home for two people. At the time of the inspection there were two people with learning disabilities living at the home.

At our last inspection we rated the service good. At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of good and there was no evidence or information from our inspection and on-going monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

At this inspection we found the service remained Good.

Staff focused on the care needs of each individual and knew people’s individual communication skills, abilities and preferences. We observed that the staff approach was caring and kind. They talked to people with dignity and respect and supported people to make decisions about their life and day to day needs. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible, the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People had detailed care plans which reflected their abilities and support requirements. People’s risks had been assessed and were being monitored. Referrals to health care professionals had been made appropriately when additional support was needed and their medicines were managed and administered safely. People were provided with opportunities to maintain their interests and hobbies and live an enriched life. People’s views were encouraged and valued. Staff acted promptly when concerns were raised.

There were sufficient numbers of skilled and trained staff to meet people’s health and welfare needs. Staff felt supported by the registered and assistant manager. Quality assurance systems were in place to monitor the quality of service being delivered and the running of the home.

Further information is in the detailed findings below.

Inspection carried out on 7 October 2016

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

Woodmancote Manor is registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to provide accommodation and personal care for up to two people. At the time of our inspection two people with learning disabilities were using the service.

This inspection took place on 7 October 2016. Our last inspection of the service was in November 2014. At that time we rated the service as ‘good’ and found no breaches of regulation. This inspection was carried out as a result of concerns shared with us by health and social care professionals. This inspection was focussed, meaning we looked at, and have reported on, whether the service was safe, effective and well-led. You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection by selecting the 'all reports' link for Woodmancote Manor on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The two people using the service were siblings. The registered manager of the service was foster sibling to the two people. The registered manager told us that Woodmancote Manor was the family home for all of them and had been for a number of years. Our inspection showed that, although this arrangement was an unusual way of providing a health and social care service, both people led active lives surrounded by family and friends in a service regulated by CQC.

People received a service that was safe. The registered manager and staff understood their role and responsibilities in keeping people safe from harm and, knew how to raise any concerns. Risks were assessed and plans put in place to keep people safe. There was enough staff to safely provide care and support to people. Medicines were well managed and people received their medicines as prescribed. Infection control measures were in place.

Staff received regular training and the support needed to meet people’s needs. People were supported to make choices and decisions. People had enough to eat and drink. Arrangements were made for people to see their GP and other healthcare professionals when required. People’s healthcare needs were met and staff worked with health and social care professionals to access relevant services.

People benefitted from receiving a service that was well-led. The registered manager provided effective leadership and management and understood their responsibilities under the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. They were aware of the complexities involved in the service being both registered as a care home and, family home to the two people and themselves. Quality monitoring systems were used to further improve the service provided.

Inspection carried out on 13 November 2014

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 13 November 2014 and was announced. The previous inspection was carried out 22 November 2013 and there had been no breaches of legal requirements at that time. We had no previous concerns prior to this inspection.

Woodmancote Manor provides accommodation for up to two people. At the time of our visit there were two people living at the service.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The registered manager and staff understood their role and responsibilities to protect people from harm. Risks had been assessed and appropriate assessments were in place to reduce or eliminate the risk. Staffing numbers on each shift were sufficient to ensure people were kept safe.

The service was meeting the requirements of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. Staff had received appropriate training, and had a good understanding of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards.

Staff were aware of people’s individual needs. Staff treated people with kindness and compassion. People spoke positively about the service, the staff and the registered manager. They told us, "The Staff are very caring and I love spending time with them” and “I am looked after very well here”.

Staff had the knowledge and skills they needed to carry out their roles effectively. They enjoyed attending training sessions and sharing what they had learnt. Staff were supported by the provider and the registered manager at all times.

All medicines were stored, administered and disposed of safely. The service had policies and procedures for dealing with medicines and these were adhered to.

People had access to a range of healthcare professionals when they required specialist help. Care records showed advice had been sought from a range of health and social care professionals.

Inspection carried out on 22 November 2013

During a routine inspection

There were two people living at Woodmancote Manor. They are sisters and were cared for by their foster sister who lived with them in the family home. The sisters have been part of the family for over 40 years and were considered family. As well as being supported by the manager and her husband two support workers were employed to assist. It was very evident that warm relationships were built on a caring relationship, trust and knowledge of the people being supported had been established.

During our inspection we spoke with the two people who were living at the home. We saw that they were relaxed in the company of the staff. One sister told us the staff were "nice" and "are caring, patient and I like them". This person told us "this is our home, we are very happy here".

We also spoke with the two members of staff who felt the home was "a great place to be" and "it’s not really like a job. I enjoy spending time with X and X”.

We looked at the care records for both of the people living at the home. We could see that they were supported to make decisions which affected their life.

Records were comprehensive and detailed the health and social care needs of each sister and showed how any possible risks were minimised. Records were kept under review and were updated when required.

The home was comfortable, homely and well furnished.

Inspection carried out on 16 March 2013

During a routine inspection

There were two people living at Woodmancote Manor. They are sisters and were cared for by their foster sister who lived with them in the family home. The sisters have been part of the family for over 40 years and were considered as family. As well as being supported by the manager and her husband two support workers were employed to assist. It was very evident that warm relationships built on a caring relationship, trust and knowledge of the people being supported had been established.

We saw that both people smiled and appeared relaxed and comfortable with the manager, support workers and others who lived in the home. One sister was able to talk to us about living in the home and told us that they were happy and well looked after. They told us that they were asked if they needed help. They told us, “They are all very good". And "They do chat to me about my care and what help I want. I'm quite happy I have everything I need".

During our inspection we saw that both sisters received good care and that staff treated them with respect and kindness.

The sisters living at the home were supported by staff that had been trained and supported to meet their needs.

The provider had an effective system to regularly assess and monitor the quality of service that the sisters in their care received. The provider had a sound knowledge of the sisters needs and systems were in place to ensure their care, welfare and safety. Standards were maintained.