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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Outstanding

Updated 30 June 2018

Stakesby Road is a care home. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

Stakesby Road is situated in Whitby and accommodates up to three people who have profound and multiple learning disabilities. The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.

Inspection site visits took place on 26 March and 11 April 2018 and were announced. At the time of this inspection, the service was providing support to two people.

At the last comprehensive inspection in October 2015 we found the service was meeting requirements and awarded a rating of good. At this inspection we found the registered manager and staff team had developed the service further to achieve an outstanding rating.

There was a manager in post who had registered with the Care Quality Commission. They assisted throughout the inspection process. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Discussions with staff demonstrated they were extremely passionate about the people they supported, building effective communication and improving the quality of life people had. Staff spoke with empathy and enthusiasm as they explained future activities planned and improvements people had made with their health and well-being. Staff approached and responded to people as individuals, tailoring how to do this based on their in-depth knowledge of the person. This meant we observed meaningful relationships based on trust and mutual respect.

Staff described the importance of people being able to have meaningful, private communication with relatives. Photographs of activities and daily events were taken by staff and placed in a memory book. This gave relatives the opportunity to stimulate meaningful conversations with the person about their week without staff being present.

Potential barriers to communication were addressed through staff’s in depth understanding of people’s unique communication styles which were detailed in people’s care records. People had access to a range of technology as well as communication boards, picture cards and photographs.

It was clear staff understood the importance of maximising the opportunities for people to experience sensory stimuli such as touch.

People were encouraged to form goals towards their independence such as becoming more active and were supported to work towards these through keeping them under review. Case studies were produced by staff to record progress and what the outcomes for people were.

Respect and regard for privacy and dignity were at the core of the service’s culture and values. Staff had received training in how to treat people with respect and kindness. The ethos of the home was to make people feel special and that their lives and feelings mattered.

Relatives, staff and people were equal partners in designing the care people wanted in the way they wanted it. Staff gathered each person's life history and used this to develop positive relationships and design care which included the person's preferences. Support plans were written in an exceptionally person-centred way with detailed instructions on how to provide care which was appropriate to the person.

The service had a creative approach in supporting people to make their own decisions. The use of technology was embraced to enable p

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 30 June 2018

The service was safe.

Staff received training on safeguarding adults from abuse and understood their responsibility to report any incidents of abuse to the relevant people.

Positive risk taking was embraced and comprehensive risk management plans were in place for people and the service where required.

Medicines were stored securely, administered safely and staff competencies had been assessed.

Safe recruitment processes had been followed. People and relatives were actively involved in selection and recruitment.

Effective

Good

Updated 30 June 2018

The service was effective.

Staff had received extensive training which was provided through a range of provision to accommodate preferred learning styles.

Staff were receiving regular and constructive supervision and appraisal, which was recorded and focused on areas of improvement, how this could be achieved as well as acknowledging good practice and progress made.

Where people lacked the capacity to make particular decision�s a person-centred approach made in the person�s best interest had been applied.

Staff had a proactive approach to promoting and improving people�s health and nutrition. People were closely monitored to maintain good health and comfort.

Caring

Good

Updated 30 June 2018

The service was caring.

Staff embraced the use of technology to encourage effective communication.

People were encouraged to form goals towards their independence and were supported to work towards these.

Respect and regard for privacy and dignity were at the core of the service�s culture and values and we found information around these core values on display in the staff room at the service.

Staff we spoke with were able to recite the dignity charter which was in place that had been developed by people and staff.

Responsive

Outstanding

Updated 30 June 2018

The service was extremely responsive.

People were involved in the planning of their care. Support plans were written in an exceptionally person-centred way with detailed instructions on how to provide care which was appropriate to the person.

Potential barriers to communication were addressed through staff�s in-depth understanding of people�s unique communication styles which were detailed in people�s care records.

Activities were offered as a result of consultation with people and their relatives about their interests. Staff understood the importance of maximising the opportunities for people to experience sensory stimuli.

End of life care and support had been provided in a person-centred, dignified manner with people�s wishes at the centre of the support.

Well-led

Outstanding

Updated 30 June 2018

The service was extremely well-led.

People and relatives confirmed that the registered manager listened to and acted upon any views without hesitation. Communication between the registered manager and people, relatives and staff was open, enabling and supportive.

The registered manager was continuously trying to improve the service and the quality of care provided. They took control of their own learning and understood areas for improvement. Extensive quality assurance system were in place to monitor and improve the service.

The day to day values and culture of the service were highlighted at handovers, supervision and in monthly staff meetings.

Staff were supported with any areas they felt challenging and told us they valued having well established senior staff they could consult for advice.