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Hartfield House Rest Home Good

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 1 September 2018

We inspected Hartfield House on 7 and 9 August 2018. The first day of the inspection was unannounced. We previously inspected the home in May 2017 where we found improvements were needed to ensure risks associated with peoples’ complex health needs were well managed. We also found improvements were needed to ensure daily notes and other documentation was consistently completed. At this inspection we found improvements had been made.

Hartfield House is a care home. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

Hartfield House provides accommodation and personal care for up to 20 people in one adapted building. At the time of the inspection 19 people were living at the home. People living at the home were older people who had a range of needs associated with old age and their health. Some people were living with the early stages of dementia.

People were supported by staff who were kind and caring. They knew people well and had a good understanding of their health and care needs, choices and interests. Staff worked hard to ensure people received good quality care that was person-centred. There were a range of activities taking place and people were supported to keep busy and engaged throughout the day. They were able to continue their own interests and hobbies. People were relaxed and comfortable in the company of staff. People’s dignity and privacy was respected. The company statement, “Care like family” was evident throughout the inspection.

Before people moved into the home assessments were completed. This helped ensure their needs and choices could be met. Information from these assessments were then used to develop care plans and risk assessments. These were regularly reviewed. Staff had a good understanding of people’s needs and the risks associated with supporting people and these were well managed.

There were enough staff working each day to meet people's needs. Safe recruitment practices were followed to ensure staff were appropriate to work at the home. Staff had received training they needed and there were opportunities for additional training specific to the needs of the service. This included the care of people with specific health problems such as diabetes. Training was regularly updated.

People were supported to eat and drink a variety of freshly cooked meals and drinks each day. Their health was monitored and staff responded when health needs changed by contacting appropriate healthcare professionals.

Systems were in place to ensure accidents and incidents were well managed and actions taken to prevent reoccurrence. Staff understood how to safeguard people from the risk of abuse and discrimination. Systems were in place to ensure medicines were ordered, stored, given and disposed of safely.

People are supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff support them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service support this practice. Staff had received training on the Mental Capacity Act (2005) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) and demonstrated an understanding of the legal requirements.

People and staff were asked for their opinions on the service and whether they were happy at the home. Staff felt supported within their roles and told us the registered manager had an ‘open door’ policy and they could discuss any concerns or problems with them.

There were a range of audits and checks in place. These were used to identify where improvements were needed across the service. There was a complaints policy in place and people and visitors told us they would raise any concerns with staff.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 1 September 2018

The service was safe.

Risks to people were well managed and the home was clean and tidy throughout.

Systems were in place to ensure accidents and incidents were well managed.

Staff understood how to safeguard people from the risk of abuse and discrimination.

There were enough staff, who had been appropriately recruited, working at the home.

Systems were in place to ensure medicines were ordered, stored, given and disposed of safely.

Effective

Good

Updated 1 September 2018

The service was effective.

Staff had received training on the Mental Capacity Act (2005) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) and demonstrated an understanding of the legal requirements.

Staff received training and support which enabled them to provide appropriate care and support to people. This was regularly updated so staff had the knowledge to effectively meet people�s needs.

People�s health needs were met and they were able to make choices about what they wanted to eat and drink each day.

Caring

Good

Updated 1 September 2018

The service was caring.

People were supported by staff who were kind and caring. Staff knew people well and were committed to providing care and support that people required.

People were enabled to make decisions and choices about what they done each day.

People�s dignity and privacy was respected.

Responsive

Good

Updated 1 September 2018

The service was responsive.

People received person-centred care that met their individual needs and choices. Staff knew people well and understood their care and support needs.

Activities were taking place throughout the day and people were supported to maintain their own hobbies and interests.

There was a complaints policy in place and people and visitors told us they would raise any concerns with staff.

Well-led

Good

Updated 1 September 2018

The service was well-led.

The registered manager was well thought of and supportive to people and staff.

Quality assurance systems identified where improvements were needed across the service.

Systems were in place to gather feedback from people and staff and this was used to improve the service.