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Archived: Dementia Care and Support at Home Office Good

The provider of this service changed - see new profile

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 29 December 2014

We carried out this unannounced inspection under Section 60 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 as part of our regulatory functions. This inspection was planned to check whether the provider is meeting the legal requirements of the Health and Social Care Act 2008. It was also part of the second testing phase of the new inspection process CQC is introducing for adult social care services. The inspection consisted of a lead inspector from the Care Quality Commission and an expert by experience. An expert-by-experience is a person who has personal experience of using or caring for someone who uses this type of care service.

Dementia Care and Support at Home is a care service that provides support to people in their own home, some of whom suffer from the early stages of dementia. The agency office is located on a busy main road in Swinton with parking space available for staff and other people who may wish to visit the office. At the time of our inspection the agency provided care and support to 11 people and employed six members of staff.

There was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service and has the legal responsibility for meeting the requirements of the law; as does the provider.

We identified one person as being ‘at risk’ of choking whilst eating their food, however an appropriate risk assessment had not been completed which could place this person at risk. We raised this issue with the manager. Staff had undertaken training on safeguarding adults from abuse and they displayed a good knowledge of the action they would take to manage any incidents or allegations of potential abuse. People who used the service and their relatives told us that they felt safe whilst staff were with them in their home.

People told us that they felt care workers cared about them and listened to them. They gave positive feedback about their individual care workers.

There were care plans in place that described people’s care and support needs and how these would be met by staff. The registered manager completed ‘variation’ forms when people’s needs changed or needed to me amended. Relatives we spoke with told us they were kept updated about any changes to a person’s care needs.

People were supported to remain as independent as possible and to retain contact with the local community. There were appropriate risk assessments in place that allowed people to take responsibility for their actions and be as independent as possible, but remain safe.

Staff had undertaken training on the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA)

Staff had undertaken training that provided them with the skills to carry out their role effectively. People who used the service told us that staff had the right kind of knowledge and skills and that they were reliable and trustworthy. They said that generally, they arrived at the right time and stayed for the agreed length of time, but that on occasions they were sometimes held up whilst on other visits.

Inspection areas

Safe

Requires improvement

Updated 29 December 2014

Not all aspects of the service were safe. We identified one person as being ‘at risk’ of choking whilst eating their food, however an appropriate risk assessment had not been completed. We raised this issue with the manager.

We saw that people had care plans in place which  included risk assessments that were intended to protect people from the risk of harm, such as moving and handling techniques to be used by staff. In addition, there were risk assessments in place about each person’s home environment.

We checked the recruitment records of four members of staff and saw that robust recruitment and selection practices were followed. This included ensuring DBS (Disclosure Barring Service) checks were undertaken and a minimum of two references obtained from previous employers before staff started work.

Effective

Good

Updated 29 December 2014

The service was effective. We looked at the staff induction programme as part of our inspection. A staff induction is undertaken when staff first commenced employment with the company. This gave new staff a thorough understanding of how the company operates, what is expected of them and to ensure they received relevant training to care for people safely.

We saw that there were sufficient staff employed to ensure that people received a service in a timely manner and from a consistent group of staff. We saw that the system used to devise staff rotas identified a person’s regular care worker and allocated the person’s weekly visits to them whenever possible.

We saw that initial needs assessments had been completed by staff to work out what support people needed when the care package first started. Information about the person’s individual support needs had been recorded as well as information about their chosen lifestyle.

Caring

Good

Updated 29 December 2014

The service was caring. People and their relatives spoke positively about their care workers who they said treated them with courtesy, kindness and respect.

People said they had a positive relationship with their care workers who "cheered them up." People told us they mainly had regular care workers who knew them and understood their individual needs and preferences although on occasions this was different if staff were ever unavailable.

People and their relatives told us that they felt the staff listened to them, cared about them and respected their wishes at all times.

Responsive

Good

Updated 29 December 2014

The service was responsive. Care plans recorded information about people, including the people who were important to them and their hobbies and interests, and this enabled staff to provide the right service to meet their individual needs.

Care workers told us that the manager would tell them about any changes to a person’s care needs prior to their next visit so that they were aware of up to date information, and that care plans were updated when needed. We saw ‘variation’ forms were completed which showed us staff responded appropriately when people’s care requirements changed or needed to be updated.

We saw that information about the complaints procedure was included in the service user guide, however on the day of our inspection there had been no complaints made against the service. One relative commented “The manager is very approachable and deals with things quickly”.

Well-led

Good

Updated 29 December 2014

The service was well-led. On the day of the inspection there was a registered manager in post who was also the owner of the service and was appropriately registered with the Care Quality Commission. In addition, other members of staff included a supervisor, a trainee supervisor and three care assistants who were all involved in providing care within the community.

Whilst speaking with people who used the service and their relatives, we asked if they felt the service was well led. Comments included; “They work very well together as a team” and “Things appear to very well organised” and “They (managers/supervisors) do observation checks of staff which is important”.