• Doctor
  • GP practice

New Islington Medical Practice

Overall: Good

Old Mill Street, Ancoats, Manchester, Lancashire, M4 6EE (0161) 272 5660

Provided and run by:
Dr Wameedh Abdul Razak Ali

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

Latest inspection summary

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Background to this inspection

Updated 6 March 2018

New Islington Medical Practice is the registered provider and provides primary care services to its registered list of 5508 patients. The practice delivers commissioned services under a General Medical Services (GMS) contract and is a member of Manchester Health and Care Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG).

The GMS contract is the contract between general practices and NHS England for delivering primary care services to local communities. The practice is registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to provide the regulated activities of diagnostic and screening procedures, maternity and midwifery services and treatment of disease, disorder and injury.

Regulated activities are delivered to the patient population from the following address:

Ancoats Primary Care Centre

Old Mill Street

Ancoats

Manchester

Lancashire

M4 6EE

The practice has a website that contains comprehensive information about what they do to support their patient population and the in house and online services offered:

www.nismp.co.uk

The practice is situated in an area at number one on the deprivation scale (the lower the number, the higher the deprivation). People living in more deprived areas tend to have greater need for health services.

The male life expectancy for the area is 73 years compared with the CCG average of 73 years and the national average of 79 years. The female life expectancy for the area is 79 years compared with the CCG average of 78 years and the national average of 83 years.

Overall inspection

Good

Updated 6 March 2018

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out a comprehensive inspection as part of our inspection programme at the practice of New Islington Medical Practice on 6 June 2017 which was rated as requires improvement in the safe domain of the report and overall as good. The key questions were rated as:

Safe – requires improvement

Effective – good

Caring – good

Responsive – good

Well led – good

We carried out a focused follow up desk based inspection on 20 February 2018 where we found the practice had made significant improvements. The full comprehensive report for this inspection can be found by selecting the ‘all reports’ link for New Islington Medical Practice on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

This inspection was an announced focused inspection carried out on 20 February 2018 to confirm that the practice had carried out their plan to meet the legal requirements in relation to the breach in regulations that we identified in our previous inspection on 6 June 2017. This report covers our findings in relation to those requirements and also additional improvements made since our last inspection.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

People with long term conditions

Good

Updated 14 July 2017

The practice is rated as good for the care of people with long-term conditions.

  • Nursing staff had lead roles in long-term disease management and patients at risk of hospital admission were identified as a priority.
  • The practice followed up on patients with long-term conditions discharged from hospital and ensured that their care plans were updated to reflect any additional needs.
  • There were emergency processes for patients with long-term conditions who experienced a sudden deterioration in health. For example, all patients with the condition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD which is a condition of the lung) had been educated about self-management of the condition and provided with a rescue pack to prevent hospital admission. The rescue pack contained medicines to help relieve and or prevent hospital admission.
  • 75% of patients with asthma had an asthma review completed in the preceding 12 months, compared to the CCG average of 75% and national average of 76%
  • All these patients had a named GP and there was a system to recall patients for a structured annual review to check their health and medicines needs were being met. For those patients with the most complex needs, the named GP worked with relevant health and care professionals to deliver a multidisciplinary package of care.

Families, children and young people

Good

Updated 14 July 2017

The practice is rated as good for the care of families, children and young people.

  • From the sample of documented examples we reviewed we found there were systems to identify and follow up children living in disadvantaged circumstances and who were at risk, for example, children and young people who had a high number of accident and emergency (A&E) attendances.
  • Patients told us, on the day of inspection, that children and young people were treated in an age-appropriate way and were recognised as individuals.
  • 72% of eligible women had received a cervical screening test in the preceding five years, compared to the CCG average of 78% and national average of 81%.
  • Appointments were available outside of school hours and the premises were suitable for children and babies, with extended opening hours every Thursday till 8.30pm.
  • The practice offered “R U Clear “a NHS screening test, which provided confidential tests for sexually transmitted infections.

Older people

Good

Updated 14 July 2017

The practice is rated as good for the care of older people.

  • Staff were able to recognise the signs of abuse in older patients and knew how to escalate any concerns.
  • The practice offered proactive, personalised care to meet the needs of the older patients in its population.
  • The practice was responsive to the needs of older patients, and offered home visits and urgent appointments for those with enhanced needs.
  • Patients over age of 75 years had a named GP.
  • The practice followed up on older patients discharged from hospital and ensured that their care plans were updated to reflect any extra needs.

Working age people (including those recently retired and students)

Good

Updated 14 July 2017

The practice is rated as good for the care of working age people (including those recently retired and students).

  • The practice used to good effect the Mjog system which sends text messages to patients, informing them of test results and enabling them to make or cancel appointments.
  • The needs of these populations had been identified and the practice had adjusted the services it offered to ensure these were accessible, flexible and offered continuity of care, for example, extended opening hours and Saturday and Sunday appointments via the GPPO Hub .
  • The practice was proactive in offering online services as well as a full range of health promotion and screening that reflects the needs for this age group.

People experiencing poor mental health (including people with dementia)

Good

Updated 14 July 2017

The practice is rated as good for the care of people experiencing poor mental health (including people with dementia).

  • The practice carried out advance care planning for patients living with dementia.
  • The practice regularly worked with multi-disciplinary teams in the case management of patients experiencing poor mental health, including those living with dementia.
  • Patients at risk of dementia were identified and offered an assessment.
  • The practice had a system to follow up patients who had attended accident and emergency where they may have been experiencing poor mental health.

People whose circumstances may make them vulnerable

Good

Updated 14 July 2017

The practice is rated as good for the care of people whose circumstances may make them vulnerable.

  • The practice held a register of patients living in vulnerable circumstances including homeless people, travellers and those with a learning disability.
  • End of life care was delivered in a coordinated way which took into account the needs of those whose circumstances may make them vulnerable.
  • The practice offered longer appointments for patients with a learning disability.
  • The practice regularly worked with other health care professionals in the case management of vulnerable patients.
  • The practice had information available for vulnerable patients about how to access various support groups and voluntary organisations.
  • Staff interviewed knew how to recognise signs of abuse in children, young people and adults whose circumstances may make them vulnerable. They were aware of their responsibilities regarding information sharing, documentation of safeguarding concerns and how to contact relevant agencies in normal working hours and out of hours.