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Archived: Stocksbridge Neurological Care Centre Good

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

The provider of this service changed - see new profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 4 September 2018

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 4 September 2018 and was unannounced. This meant no-one at the service knew we were planning to visit.

We checked progress the registered provider had made following our inspection on 9 and 31 July 2017 when we found one breach of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. This was Regulation 19, Fit and proper persons employed. We also found a breach of Regulation 18 of the Care Quality Commission (Registration) Regulations 2009, Notification of other incidents.

Following the last inspection, we asked the registered provider to complete an action plan to show what they would do and by when to improve the key questions of safe and well-led to at least good. During this inspection we found improvements had been made and the registered provider was no longer in breach of regulations.

Stocksbridge Neurological Care Centre is a ‘care home.’ People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. Stocksbridge Neurological Care Centre is a 24 bed home providing personal and nursing care to people who have a brain injury. There were 18 people living at Stocksbridge Neurological Care Centre at the time of this inspection.

There was a registered manager employed at the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

There were enough staff available to ensure people’s needs were met. The registered provider had robust recruitment procedures to make sure staff had the required skills and were of suitable character and background.

Medicines were stored safely and securely, and procedures were in place to ensure people received their medicines as prescribed.

Staff understood what it meant to protect people from abuse. They were confident any concerns they raised would be taken seriously by the registered nurse on duty and management, and responded to appropriately.

The premises were clean and well maintained. Staff understood their roles and responsibilities in relation to infection control and hygiene.

Staff understood the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. The registered provider’s policies and systems supported this practice.

People enjoyed the food served at Stocksbridge Neurological Care Centre, which we saw took into account their dietary needs and preferences. Where appropriate, people were supported and encouraged to eat and drink.

Staff were provided with an induction and ongoing relevant training to make sure they had the right skills and knowledge for their role. Staff received regular supervision and yearly appraisal performance meetings, which they found useful.

People's privacy and dignity was respected and promoted. Staff understood how to support people in a sensitive way, while promoting their independence. People were treated with dignity and respect.

There was a range of activities and therapies available to people. People were supported to engage in activities that were important to them.

People’s care records reflected the person’s current health and social care needs. Care records contained up to date risk assessments and were regularly reviewed.

People, their relatives and staff told us the registered manager and business manager were supportive and approachable.

People, their relatives and staff were regularly asked for their views of the service. Concerns and suggestions were considered and acted upon.

There were effective sys

Inspection carried out on 19 July 2017

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 19 and 31 July 2017 and was unannounced. This was the first rated inspection of this service since it registered with us on 30 April 2016. This service was previously owned by a different registered provider.

Stocksbridge Neurological Care Centre is registered to provide accommodation and personal care for up to 24 people who have a brain injury. During the inspection there were 17 people who used the service.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act (2008) and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us that they were safe within the service and this was supported by their relatives. The service knew how to keep people safe by training staff in how to do this, managing risks to people and the environment, ensuring there were sufficient staff on duty with appropriate knowledge and skills and managing medicines in a safe way.

Improvements were required with the information and documents obtained about staff during their recruitment to evidence they were fit and proper persons to be employed.

Staff received relevant training, supervision and appraisal.

People were supported to have choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. Policies and systems in the service ensured the service complied with the Mental Capacity Act.

People were supported in a friendly environment. Staff were caring and kind towards people. People’s privacy, dignity and independence was respected.

People were involved in the assessment and care planning process and were able to access advocate and healthcare support when needed. People were able to get the appropriate assistance to be able to share their views on how they wanted to be supported. Care records were personalised and regularly reviewed.

People participated in activities they chose to do to enhance their wellbeing and improve their quality of life.

People, relatives and staff were confident in reporting concerns to the registered manager and provider and felt they would be listened to.

People, relatives and staff were able to share their views about the service.

There were systems in place to assess and monitor the quality of service provided, so improvements continued to be made.

The service had not notified all incidents to the Care Quality Commission as required by the regulations.

The service was in breach of two regulations. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of the report.