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Reports


Inspection carried out on 16 December 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service:

Roclyns Rest Home provides support and accommodation for up to 19 people who require assistance due to frailty of old age and health care needs. There were 17 people living at the home at the time of the inspection; some were living with dementia and others needed support with daily living including washing, dressing and mobilising safely. The home has two communal lounges and a dining area, the bedrooms are on the ground and first floor and a passenger lift enables people to access all parts of the home. There is a large garden to the rear that is accessible to people using walking aids and wheelchairs.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found:

Whilst the registered manager was experienced and was focused on continuously learning and making improvements to the home, some audit processes were not sufficiently robust and had not identified inconsistencies in some documentation and practice which were identified during the inspection. While we found no significant impact on people, this is an area that required improvement to ensure effective monitoring and quality assurance. The registered manager was responsive and took action immediately in response to our feedback.

The registered manager had created an open and positive culture and staff knew people well. Staff felt well supported and the home had a warm and welcoming atmosphere. One member of staff said, “The managers are very approachable, if they're not having a meeting, you'd think they were one of the carers. If something needs doing, they do it. They get their hands dirty.”

People told us they felt safe and knew who to contact if they had any concerns. People remained protected from avoidable harm. There was a safeguarding policy and staff received training. Staff knew how to recognise the potential signs of abuse and knew what action to take to keep people safe.

There was enough staff to support people safely and the registered manager had safe recruitment procedures and processes in place. People received care and support from trained staff who knew them well. People received their medicines safely from staff who were trained and competent to do so.

Risks to people were assessed to keep them safe. This included potential risks related to their health, or risks from the environment. The environment continued to meet people's needs. The home had sufficient room for people to move around safely and the provider had ensured the environment met the needs of people living with dementia. The provider was investing to improve the facilities and environment to ensure the service continued to meet people’s needs as these changed over time.

People were protected by the prevention and control of infection. Staff wore gloves and aprons when supporting people.

People were supported to maintain their health and had assistance to access health care services when they needed to. People had access to services such the GP, speech and language therapists (SALT), chiropodists, opticians, dentists and others. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People continued to have access to activities and people were happy with the variety on offer. People received compassionate and dignified end of life care that respected their wishes. People were proactively supported to maintain relationships with people who were important to them.

Staff knew people well and were able to deliver personalised care that was responsive to their needs. People were able to express their views and were actively involved in making decisions about their care, support and treatment, through reviews and daily interactions. One person said,” They are getting to know me well…. It’s totally up to me.” People received kind and compassionate care. People and relatives told us staff treated them with kindness and w

Inspection carried out on 16 May 2017

During a routine inspection

Roclyns Rest Home provides assistance with support and accommodation for up to 19 people who require assistance due to frailty of old age and health care needs, such as diabetes. There were 18 people living at the home at the time of the inspection; some were living with dementia and others needed support with daily living including walking around the home safely. The home has two communal lounges and a dining area, the bedrooms are on the ground and first floor and a passenger lift enables people to access all parts of the home. There is a large garden to the rear that is accessible to people using walking aids and wheelchairs.

This inspection took place on the 16 May 2017 and was unannounced.

The registered manager was present during the inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The registered manager used an effective quality assurance system that had reviewed all aspects of the services provided, including care plans and health and safety. They said this had enabled them to identify areas where improvements were needed. Staff told us a number of changes had been made since April 2016 when the provider had registered with CQC and they said the management encouraged people, relatives and staff to be involved in decisions about developing the services provided.

The CQC is required by law to monitor the operation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) which applies to care homes. The management and staff had attended training in the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards and were aware of current guidance to ensure people were protected. People had been supported through best interests meetings and referrals for DoLS had been made to the local authority to ensure people were safe.

People said the staff were very good and provided the support they wanted and needed. Staff encouraged people to be independent and make choices and individualised risk assessments provided guidance for staff to assist people to ensure their safety.

Relevant training was provided to ensure staff understood how to meet people’s needs and they were supported to develop their skills and work towards vocational qualifications.

There was an effective system in place for the management of medicines and people had access to health professionals as and when they were required.

People said the food was very good, choices were provided and the menu was based on people’s individual likes and dislikes. Group and one to one activities were available for people to participate in if they wished and people chose how and where they spent their time.

People, relatives and staff said the management was approachable and the registered manager had an open door policy to encourage them to be involved in developing the services. Satisfaction surveys were used to obtain feedback from people, relatives, staff and health professionals about the services provided.

A complaints procedure was in place. This was displayed on the notice board near the entrance to the building, and given to people, and relatives, when they moved into the home. People, relatives and staff said they did not have anything to complain about.