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Bhandal Dental Practice - 14 Redhill

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 29 November 2013
Date of Publication: 24 December 2013
Inspection Report published 24 December 2013 PDF | 76.77 KB

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 29 November 2013, checked how people were cared for at each stage of their treatment and care and talked with people who use the service. We talked with staff.

Our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

Reasons for our judgement

Before people received any treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. We looked at six people’s treatment plans and found them all to have evidence of written consent. The dentist told us that people’s consent was also sought verbally once they were in the treatment room and this was also recorded. People we spoke with and records we saw confirmed this. One person said, “Oh yes my consent is always given and any treatment I need is discussed with me”. We found that where people needed support from an interpreter this was provided by the provider where people were unable to get support from relatives. This meant that treatment would only be given once people were able to give their consent.

Where people did not have the capacity to consent, the provider acted in accordance with legal requirements. The dentist told us that people would not be treated if they were unable to give their consent. Where people could not give their consent, then they would get consent from a relative or seek further advice from managers as to the best course of action to support people. The staff we spoke with were able to explain the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) and the implications for the service where people were not able to give their consent to treatment. The MCA is a legal framework which empowers and protects people who may lack capacity to make decisions for themselves. Records showed that staff had received MCA training and the staff we spoke with confirmed this. This meant that where people did not have the capacity to give their consent staff had the knowledge and skills to support people appropriately.

We spoke to the dentist who was able to confirm that where children were being treated their parents or guardian would be involved to give consent on their behalf. Any treatment would be explained to both children and their parent or guardian, this to ensure children were clear on their treatment options and understood the treatment being proposed. Records showed evidence of parents giving written and verbal consent for treatment and written notes confirming the discussions that took place.