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St Mary's Urgent Treatment Centre Good

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 25 August 2021

This service is rated as

Good

overall. The service had previously been inspected on 5 June 2019. Overall the report was rated as good, but at the latest inspection in 2019 the service was found to be in breach of regulation 12 (Safe care and treatment) of The Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. The safe key question was rated as requires improvement and a requirement notice was issued. The specific issues found which beached regulation 12 were in regards to non-clinical staff at the service being able to recognise presentations which required priority, for example sepsis.

We carried out an announced focussed inspection of St Mary’s Urgent Treatment Centre on 23 July 2021, where we reviewed the identified breaches from the previous report in the safe key question only. We are mindful of the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on our regulatory function. We will continue to discharge our regulatory enforcement functions required to keep people safe and to hold providers to account where it is necessary for us to do so. We found that all of the breaches of regulation from the previous inspection had been addressed. Following this inspection, the key questions are rated as:

The key questions are rated as:

Are services safe? – Good

Our key findings were:

  • The service provided care in a way that kept patients safe and protected them from avoidable harm.

Dr Rosie Benneyworth BM BS BMedSci MRCGP


Chief Inspector of Primary Medical Services and Integrated Care

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 25 August 2021

We rated safe as Good because:

We carried out this announced comprehensive inspection on 23 July 2021. We had previously carried out an announced comprehensive inspection in June 2019. At the time of the first inspection the service was not providing safe services. We found the following:

  • The provider had failed to facilitate formal training to non-clinical reception staff at the point of entry to the service in A&E and the UTC to assure themselves that staff could adequately recognise emergency symptoms, for example sepsis.

At the time of the inspection visit on 23 July 2021, this issue had been addressed.

Risks to patients

There were systems to assess, monitor and manage risks to patient safety.

  • There were arrangements for planning and monitoring the number and mix of staff needed. There was an effective system in place for dealing with surges in demand.
  • There was an effective induction system for temporary staff tailored to their role.
  • Non-clinical staff had undertaken training in basic life support and the identification of emergency symptoms, including sepsis. Staff that we spoke to were aware of what to look for when patients attended, and in what circumstances a clinician should be alerted immediately.
  • The service had arrangements in place to respond to medical emergencies. The UTC was located within the hospital trust estate and operated within its emergency response protocol through the standard crash call telephone number. There was a resuscitation trolley within the centre which was easily accessible and stocked identically to those within the hospital trust to ensure consistency. We saw there was a defibrillator available and oxygen with adult and children’s masks.

Effective

Good

Updated 25 August 2021

Caring

Good

Updated 25 August 2021

Responsive

Good

Updated 25 August 2021

Well-led

Good

Updated 25 August 2021