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Inspection carried out on 15 August 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

MM Care Services Ltd is a domiciliary care agency. It provides personal care to people living in their own houses and flats in the community. The service provides care for older people and younger adults with needs relating to dementia and physical disabilities. There was one person using this service at the time of our inspection. Only one person received the regulated activity of personal care.

Not everyone who used the service received personal care. CQC only inspects where people receive personal care. This is help with tasks related to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do we also consider any wider social care provided.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People’s needs associated with risk had been assessed, but not fully explored to ensure staff had sufficient guidance to support and manage all known risks. Systems were in place to monitor and manage safeguarding’s to ensure people were kept safe. People were encouraged to raise concerns and felt safe with the staff that cared for them, but information to tell them how to do this required updating. Recruitment processes were robust enough to ensure people employed were safe to work with the people who used the service. People were responsible for their own medicines at the time of inspection, however policy and procedures were in place for medicines to be administered as prescribed and in a safe way. People were protected from cross contamination because staff followed infection control policy and procedures. Processes and procedures were in place to ensure Lessons were learned and action would be taken when things went wrong.

People consented to their care and support. The Mental Capacity Act (MCA) was considered when decisions about care were made. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People’s needs were assessed and delivered as reflected in their care plan, but the care plans needed to be more detailed to ensure they were written in a person centred way. Staff received sufficient training to support them in their role. Staff prepared meals when needed and fully supported people to have sufficient to eat and drink. Where appropriate people were supported to attend appointments, such as the GP; to help achieve a positive outcome for their health and wellbeing.

People were cared for by kind, compassionate and polite staff. There was an opportunity for people to discuss their care and support on a regular basis. Advocate support was acquired if people needed support to express their views. People were shown respect and their dignity was protected always.

People’s care plans included choice, needs and preferences. People’s communication needs were appropriately accommodated. People were supported to avoid social isolation and encouraged to be independent. Systems were in place to monitor and address complaints. Staff had been trained in end of life care. Policy and procedures were in place to ensure people had the opportunity to share and understand their wishes, needs and preferences at the end of their life.

The service promoted an honest and open culture. The provider understood and acted on the duty of candour. The registered manager was aware of their responsibility and had a clear oversight of the service. The management were open and transparent with a willingness to learn and improve. The provider worked with other professionals and developed networks within the community.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection: Inspected but not rated (report published 23 January 2019).

This service was registered with us on 05/01/2016 and this is the first rated inspection.

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Inspection carried out on 17 December 2018

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 17 December 2018 and was announced. We gave the provider 72 hours' notice of our visit because the location provides a domiciliary care service and we needed to make sure that there would be someone at the office at the time of our visit. On 19 December 2018, we made telephone calls to the person using the service and staff for their views on the service. This was the first inspection since the provider's registration on 5 January 2016.

MM Care Services Ltd is a domiciliary care agency. It provides personal care to people living in their own houses and flats in the community. The service caters for older people and younger adults with needs relating to dementia and physical disabilities. There were two people using this service at the time of our inspection. Only one person received the regulated activity of personal care.

The service had a registered manager, they were also the service provider. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.’

Though the service has been inspected it has not been rated because at the time of the inspection visit a limited service was being provided, one person was receiving support with personal care.

We have made a recommendation about risk assessments, ensuring these are in place where any support is being provided to a person.

Quality assurance systems were in place to ensure people using the service received good quality care and support. The registered manager confirmed that these systems would be fully implemented as the service develops.

A person using the service told us they were happy with the care and support they received. They felt the staff were kind, caring and respectful.

Recruitment procedures ensured prospective staff were suitable to care for people receiving personal care in their own homes.

When needed, people were supported to maintain their dietary requirements. Staff we spoke with were aware of who to contact in an event of an emergency.

One person told us they knew how to make a complaint and felt the provider would take action to address their concerns.