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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 5 May 2018

The inspection took place on 10 and 11 April 2018 and was unannounced. Manor Place Nursing Home is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

The care home accommodates up to 60 people in a three storey building, providing care on four designated units for people who require nursing and/ or dementia care. Communal areas were located on the ground floor, and the service was situated around an enclosed courtyard area and secure garden. At the time of the inspection there were 52 people living there.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People had been safeguarded from the risk of abuse; staff understood both their role and duty to protect people and had access to relevant guidance. A range of risks to people had been assessed and care plans were in place to manage them. The required utility and equipment safety checks had been completed to ensure their safe use. People were safe as they were cared for by sufficient numbers of staff whose suitability for their role had been assessed. Processes were in place to ensure people received only the medicines they required, from trained staff. The service was clean and staff had undergone relevant training to enable them to understand how to protect people from the risk of infection. Processes were in place to ensure learning took place following incidents and improvements had been made to people’s care to reduce the risk of repetition.

People’s needs had been assessed prior to them being offered a service. The provision of people’s care reflected good practice guidance. Staff had received a suitable induction to their role, on-going training and supervision.

People’s nutritional and fluid intake needs had been identified and met. Processes were in place to ensure staff worked both across the organisation and with external professionals to ensure people’s health and social care needs were met. People were supported to access a range of healthcare professionals.

The service was in the process of being refurnished to ensure it met people’s needs. The garden was attractive, secure and accessible for people.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People told us they liked the staff, whom they felt had promoted both their independence and their privacy and dignity, visitors were welcomed. Staff treated people kindly and ensured they were comfortable. Overall people were asked for their views about their care and offered choices about their care. The registered manager had taken action to ensure all staff consistently promoted the choices available to people at lunch.

Staff understood people’s needs and work was underway to ensure written care plans were fully centred on the individual. Staff had undertaken training in meeting the needs of those living with dementia, although some staff were more confident than others in their interactions with people. People’s needs for social and spiritual stimulation had been met. People’s complaints had been listened to, responded to and used to improve the service. People had been well supported at the end of their lives.

People were cared for within a positive culture where staff felt valued. Staff felt improvements had taken place to the quality of people’s care under the leadership of the registered manager. There was a clear management structu

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 5 May 2018

The service was safe.

People were safeguarded from the risk of abuse through the processes and staff training, which were in place to protect them.

Risks to people had been assessed, their safety monitored and risks managed for them.

There were sufficient, suitable staff to keep people safe.

Processes were in place to ensure people received their medicines safely.

Processes were in place to ensure the service was clean and that people were protected from the risk of acquiring an infection.

Learning had taken place and improvements were made following incidents.

Effective

Good

Updated 5 May 2018

The service was effective.

People’s needs had been assessed and their care was delivered in accordance with best practice guidance.

Staff had undertaken relevant training and supervision to ensure they were suitably skilled to support people.

People had received sufficient amounts of food and drink to meet their needs.

Staff worked together within the service and with external organisations to ensure people received effective care and treatment.

People were supported by staff to access healthcare services.

The service was in the process of being re-furbished for people and their needs had been taken into account during this process.

Legal requirements had been met when people lacked the capacity to consent to their care.

Caring

Good

Updated 5 May 2018

The service was caring.

Staff treated people kindly and ensured they were comfortable.

People were asked for their views about their care and overall they had been offered choices. The registered manager was taking action to ensure staff consistently offered people the choice of lunch options provided.

People’s privacy, dignity and independence had been respected.

Responsive

Good

Updated 5 May 2018

The service was responsive.

People received their care from staff that understood them as individuals. Work was underway to ensure this knowledge was fully reflected in people’s care plans.

People’s needs for social and spiritual stimulation had been met.

People’s complaints had been listened to, responded to and used to improve the service.

People had been well supported at the end of their lives.

Well-led

Good

Updated 5 May 2018

The service was well-led.

People were cared for within a positive culture.

There was a clear and well-established management structure and responsibilities and legal requirements were understood.

People who used the service were engaged and involved, through meetings and quality assurance surveys.

Processes were in place to monitor the quality of the service provided and to drive improvements for people.

Staff worked in partnership with other agencies.