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Reports


Inspection carried out on 15 August 2017

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 15 August 2017 and was unannounced. The home was previously inspected during February 2016 and was found to require improvement at that time, with breaches of regulations in relation to the management and reporting of safeguarding incidents. During this inspection, we checked to see whether improvements had been made. Improvements were evident and we identified no breaches of regulations during this inspection.

Hampton House is registered to provide accommodation and personal care for up to 12 people with learning disabilities and other complex health needs. The home is a two storey, purpose-built building with a secure garden. There are private bedrooms with en-suite facilities, a sensory/cinema room, two communal bathrooms, two communal lounges and 2 communal kitchen/dining rooms. The home has a lift and is accessible for people who use a wheelchair. There were 12 people living at the home at the time of this inspection.

The home had a permanent manager in post, who had applied to register with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage Hampton House on 1 August 2017. Their application to become registered manager was being considered by CQC at the time of this inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The registered provider had a safeguarding policy in place and the staff we spoke with understood the signs to look for which may indicate potential abuse. Staff were clear about who they would report safeguarding concerns to.

Sufficient numbers of staff were employed to keep people safe and staff were recruited safely.

Risks had been assessed, such as those relating to falls, managing medicines and leisure activities. Measures had been introduced to reduce risks whilst enabling people to retain their independence.

Regular building and equipment safety checks took place. Plans and evacuation equipment were in place to safely evacuate people in the case of emergencies.

Medicines were managed, stored and administered effectively and safely. Where people were assessed as being able to administer aspects of their own medicines, this was done in a safe way.

Staff received regular training, supervision and appraisal. Staff told us they felt supported.

Staff demonstrated a good understanding of the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Decision specific mental capacity assessments had been completed for people who lacked capacity to make specific decisions, as required by the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported people in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People received appropriate support in order to have their nutrition and hydration needs met. Adapted equipment was used to enable people to remain independent. Mealtimes were a pleasant experience and people enjoyed the food. The home had been recognised for good standards of food hygiene and for ensuring healthy food options.

All of our observations indicated staff treated people with kindness and compassion. People and relatives told us staff were caring. There was a pleasant atmosphere in the home.

Some records containing personal information were kept in communal areas and were not stored in the locked cupboards intended for their storage. Once we highlighted this, the deputy manager addressed staff immediately and assured us this would be monitored.

Care plans contained person centred information, including people’s personal interests, likes and dislikes. Staff were aware of people’s needs and preferences and care was provided in line with care plans. Staff were particularly

Inspection carried out on 10 February 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 10 February 2016 and was unannounced. We previously inspected the service on 29 October 2013. The service was not in breach of health and social care regulations at that time.

Hampton House is registered to provide accommodation and personal care for up to 12 people with learning disabilities and other complex health needs. The home is a two storey, purpose-built building with a secure garden. There are private bedrooms with en suite facilities, a sensory/cinema room, two communal bathrooms, two communal lounges and 2 communal kitchen/dining rooms. The home has a lift and is accessible for people who use a wheelchair.

The service had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People indicated they felt safe living at Hampton House and the family members we spoke with felt their relatives were safe.

Staff demonstrated an understanding of different types of abuse. However, we found some incidents were not reported in line with safeguarding procedures. This demonstrated a breach of Regulation 13 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014.

Risks to people were assessed to help keep people safe.

We found staff were recruited safely and trained appropriately. There were enough staff to safely meet people’s needs.

Staff received a thorough induction and appropriate training and supervision to enable them to carry out their roles effectively.

People’s nutritional needs were met effectively and people were enabled to maintain a healthy diet. The home had been recognised for good standards of food hygiene and for ensuring healthy food options.

The registered manager adhered to the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005, which helped to ensure people’s human rights were respected.

Staff were caring in their approach and there was a pleasant atmosphere in the home. Staff knew people’s likes and dislikes and people indicated they were at ease in the company of staff. However some staff had conversations with each other about people, in the presence of the people they were discussing, without including them. People’s cultural and religious needs were considered.

People participated in meaningful activities and told us they had choice. People received care and support that was personalised to them.

Relatives and staff told us they felt the home was well led. Staff were clear about their roles and received direction and support. Regular quality assurance audits took place.

The registered manager had not ensured that safeguarding reporting procedures were followed because they had not reported some incidents relating to abuse or allegations of abuse to the Care Quality Commission. This demonstrated a breach of Regulation 18 of the Care Quality Commission (Registration) Regulations 2009.