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This service was previously registered at a different address - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 6 November 2018

During a routine inspection

This announced inspection took place at the provider`s offices, on 6 November 2018, with phone calls undertaken to people with experience of the service, on 7 November 2018. The provider was given short notice that we would be undertaking an inspection. This was because it is a small service and the manager is often out of the office supporting staff or meeting with people using the service. We needed to be sure that the manager would be in.

At our last inspection we rated the service good. At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of good and there was no evidence or information from our inspection and ongoing monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

This service is a domiciliary care agency. It provides personal care to people living in their own houses and flats in the community. It provides a service to older adults and younger disabled adults. At the time of our inspection 15 people were receiving a personal care service from the provider.

Not everyone using Elm Home Care receives a regulated activity; CQC only inspects the service being received by people provided with ‘personal care’; help with tasks related to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do we also take into account any wider social care provided.

There was a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were supported by staff who were aware of their responsibilities to raise any health and wellbeing concerns. Where safe guarding concerns had been raised these were responded to and appropriately dealt with.

Staff were aware of the risks to people and were provided with risk assessments and care plans to enable them to manage those risks. People were supported to take their medicines as prescribed and competency spot checks were in place to check staff followed the correct procedures.

Staff were provided with the information they needed to support people effectively and meet their needs. People were involved in creating their own care plans, which were detailed and reflected their choices in how the service would be delivered. Supervisors had worked in partnership with people, enabling them to be involved in the training of staff delivering their services.

We heard from people using the service that calls were never missed and happened on time. The service did not have a process for checking if all staff had arrived for the start of their shift. This can lead to people not getting their visit and has the potential to place people at risk of harm. There is also a possible impact on `lone working` staff safety. The service is working on this.

We found that the service recruitment policy was not clear on how DBS, [Disclosure and Barring Service] information should be used. The service is reviewing their policy and procedures.

Staff presented as knowledgeable and skilled in the services they were providing. New staff received induction training and a period of shadowing. There was an ongoing programme of training for all staff. A staff supervision programme was in place and training was a standard agenda item. Staff told us they felt supported and listened to by the supervisors and managers.

People were confident that if they raised a complaint it would be dealt with appropriately. The service kept a record of complaints. Records held inconsistent information and there was not an audit trail in place. There was a lack of analysis of information and therefore trends and improvement service opportunities were missed. The service is working on this.

Inspection carried out on 09 December 2015

During a routine inspection

Elm Home Care is registered to provide personal care to people in their own homes. At the time of our inspection 31 people were receiving support. Our inspection was unannounced and took place on 09 December 2015. This was the first inspection of this location.

The manager was registered with us as is required by law. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were kept safe from harm. Staff we spoke with were clear about how they could access and utilise the provider’s whistle blowing policy and that they knew how to keep people safe.

People received medicine appropriately.

There were a suitable amount of staff on duty with the skills, experience and training in order to meet people’s needs.

Relatives told us that they were able to raise any concerns they had and felt confident they would be acted upon.

Staff had knowledge on the Mental Capacity Act 2005. They obtained consent where possible and explained their actions to people.

People were supported to take food and drinks in sufficient quantities to prevent malnutrition and dehydration. People were supported to ensure their health needs were met.

Staff maintained people’s privacy and dignity whilst encouraging them to remain as independent as possible.

People and their relatives were involved in the planning of care and staff delivered care in line with what was considered to be people’s preferences and wishes.

The complaints procedure had been given to people in a clear and understandable way. People were confident that their concerns would be listened to and acted upon.

People, their relatives and staff spoke positively about the approachable nature and leadership skills of the registered manager. Structures for supervision allowing staff to understand their roles and responsibilities were in place.

Systems for updating and reviewing risk assessments and care plans to reflect people’s level of support needs and any potential related risks were effective.

Quality assurance audits were undertaken regularly. The registered manager had also ensured that checks on staff were undertaken periodically and at times out of normal working hours.

We received notifications regarding incidents and accidents.