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Thirlestaine Park Care Home Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 8 January 2021

During an inspection looking at part of the service

Thirlestaine Park Care Home provides nursing and personal care to 63 people. It provides care for older people, people with physical disabilities and people living with dementia. Care is provided across three floors. There is a range of communal areas where people could spend their time whilst socially distancing. The home also had its own gardens and outdoor spaces which people could enjoy. At the time of our visit 53 people were living at Thirlestaine Park Care Home.

We found the following examples of good practice.

¿ Visits to the home had currently been suspended for people’s relatives, except for people at the end of their life. When relative visiting restarts the service have a visiting room set up in accordance with recognised safe visiting guidance. Alternative ways, including the use of technology, had supported people’s ability to remain in contact with their relatives.

¿ The home had supported people to self-isolate where possible. People were being supported in their rooms. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) stations were in place at people’s rooms where required to support staff with appropriate barrier care.

¿ Admission to the home was completed in line with COVID-19 guidance. People were only admitted following a negative COVID-19 test result and supported to self-isolate for up to 14 days following admission to reduce the risk of introducing infection.

¿ People’s health and wellbeing was monitored. People were observed for symptoms of COVID-19 and other potential infections. Healthcare professionals had continued to provide clinical support to people as this was required. People were due to be vaccinated by healthcare professionals imminently.

¿Action had been taken to reduce the risk of infection spreading which had included the correct use of personal protective equipment (PPE), isolation of people affected by COVID-19 and the cohorting of staff to reduce the spread of infection. The service only used agency staff who were familiar with the service and people’s needs, which reduced the risk of COVID-19 entering the service.

¿ People and staff were tested in line with national guidance for care homes. Testing had helped the registered manager identify when full infection control measures needed to be implemented and when staff needed to self-isolate. Staff were being tested prior to every shift.

¿ As part of full infection control measures laundry and waste arrangements had been correctly implemented to reduce the spread of infection.

¿ Cleaning schedules had been enhanced and were followed by housekeeping staff and care staff. The service had adopted a specific cleaning technology which was actively used by all staff, on top of recognised cleaning materials.

¿ The provider’s policy for managing COVID-19 and related infection prevention and control procedures had been reviewed and kept up to date. COVID-19 guidance was also kept up to date for staff reference.

¿ Staff had received training and support in relation to infection control and COVID-19. The provider and staff had taken immediate action to manage an outbreak situation and they recorded the ongoing actions taken to support people and staff through an outbreak of COVID-19.

¿ The manager and deputy manager were implementing wellbeing meetings for staff to support them during the pandemic. Staff felt supported to ensure people’s health needs were maintained.

Inspection carried out on 13 December 2017

During a routine inspection

Thirlestaine Park Care Home is a 'care home'. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing as a single package under one contractual agreement. The Care Quality Commission regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

The care home can accommodate 63 people in one adapted building spread over three floors. Nursing care was provided on the second floor and people living with dementia lived on the first floor. People requiring help with their personal care lived on the ground floor. At the time of our inspection there were 38 people living at the home. People had individual bedrooms with en-suite facilities and also had access to a bathroom with an assisted bath. Spacious communal areas were provided on each of the three floors which included lounges and dining areas. In addition people had access to smaller private lounges, a gym, an activities room and a reception room where they and their visitors could have coffee. Grounds around the home were accessible. Raised flower beds and patio areas were provided. On the first and second floors there were enclosed balconies for people to sit outside.

This inspection took place on 13 and 14 December 2017. At the last comprehensive inspection in October 2015 the service was rated as Good overall.

At this inspection we found the service remained Good.

There was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People’s care and support was individualised reflecting their backgrounds, lifestyles and aspirations. Staff knew people well, treating them with kindness and respect. They understood how to support people who were anxious or upset, helping them to manage their emotions. People had positive relationships with staff, sharing lighter moments and laughing with them. People were encouraged to be independent and staff knew what they could and could not do for themselves. People were offered choices about their day to day lives. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. Deprivation of liberty safeguards were in place where people were restricted of their liberty.

People’s health and wellbeing was promoted. They had access to a range of health care professionals. When people’s needs changed they received the appropriate health and support to enable them to stay as well and safe as possible. People were supported to have a healthy and nutritious diet which reflected their individual dietary needs. People’s interests were considered when providing a range of activities both inside and outside of the home. People enjoyed art and flower arranging classes, using the gym, gentle exercise, music and individual clubs. A group of people had visited a local airport and had a helicopter ride. People had also been entertained by a choir and local celebrity. Good use was made of technology to make information accessible to people and to ensure they received safe care.

People were supported by staff who had been through a recruitment process which verified their competency and aptitude for the roles they were to perform. Staff had access to training to equip them with the skills to support people. They were supported to develop in their roles with individual meetings, annual appraisals and staff meetings. Staff understood how to keep people safe and were confident about raising concerns about people’s safety and wellbeing.

People’s views were sought as part of the quality assurance process to drive through improvements. A range of quality assurance audits were

Inspection carried out on 10 April 2017

During an inspection looking at part of the service

This was an announced inspection which took place on the 10 April 2017. Thirlestaine Park Care Home is a care home for up to 63 people.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We undertook this focused inspection on 10 April 2017 to check that they had followed their plan and to confirm that they now met legal requirements in relation to a breach of Regulation 19. This report only covers our findings in relation to these issues. You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection, by selecting the 'all reports' link for Thirlestaine Park Care Home on our website at www.cqc.org.uk”.

At the unannounced comprehensive inspection of this service on 8 and 9 October 2015 a breach of a legal requirement was found. After this comprehensive inspection, we asked the provider to take action to make improvements to the recruitment and selection processes for new staff. We found that staff recruitment processes had improved to a degree but further improvements were needed.

We have made a recommendation about staff recruitment processes.

Inspection carried out on 8 & 9/10/2015

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on the 8 and 9 October 2015 and was unannounced.

Thirlestaine Park Care Home is a care home for up to 63 people. At the time of our inspection there were 17 people living at the home.

Thirlestaine Park Care Home had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were not protected against the risk of being cared for by unsuitable staff because robust recruitment procedures were not applied.

People were protected from the risk of abuse by staff who understood safeguarding procedures.

There were sufficient numbers of staff who received appropriate training and had the right knowledge and skills to carry out their role. People’s medicines were managed and stored safely.

Thirlestaine Park Care Home protected people’s rights through an understanding of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the associated Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

People were treated with kindness, their privacy and dignity was respected and they were supported to maintain their independence.

People received personalised care and there were arrangements in place for people and their representatives to raise concerns about the service.

The vision and values of the service were clearly communicated to staff. Quality assurance systems were in place to monitor the quality of care and safety of the home. As part of this, the views of people using the service were taken into account and responded to.

We found a breach of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of the report.