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Inspection carried out on 4 April 2018

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 4 April 2018 and was unannounced. At the last inspection in February 2017 we found the provider was not meeting legal requirements in three areas. These related to management of medicines, supporting and training staff, and governance arrangements. We asked the provider to complete an action plan to show what they would do and by when to improve the key questions, safe, effective and well-led to at least good. At this inspection we found they had made improvements and were meeting legal requirements.

Cherry Garth is registered to provide personal care and accommodation for up to two people. The home is a bungalow with two bedrooms, two bathrooms and a communal lounge and dining kitchen with an enclosed garden. At the time of the inspection one person was using the service.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The person who used the service told us they felt safe, and received good care and support. They were very complimentary about the staff who supported them and had a good relationship with the registered manager. Care planning and risk assessment was focused on the person and ensured their needs were identified and met. Activities were person centred. Systems were in place to make sure the person’s health and nutritional needs were met. Choice was promoted and the person was involved in making decision about their care and support.

Staffing arrangements ensured the person received appropriate support from consistent workers. Staff received training and supervision to help make sure they understood their role and responsibilities. Recruitment checks were carried out before staff commenced employment such as proof of identity and criminal record. The provider obtained references but we found, for one member of staff recently appointed there were discrepancies with dates from referees and information provided in the application form. The registered manager followed these up promptly.

The provider had effective systems in place to monitor the service. Everyone was encouraged to share their experiences to help improve the service. The person who used the service said they did not have any concerns about the service and would feel very comfortable raising any issues with their keyworker, the registered manager or the senior management team who they said visited frequently.

Inspection carried out on 15 February 2017

During a routine inspection

The inspection of Cherry Garth took place on 15 February 2017 and was unannounced. The service had been registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) since July 2015 and this was the first inspection of the service. We found breaches of regulations in relation to safe care and treatment, staffing and governance.

Cherry Garth is registered to provide personal care and accommodation for up to two people. The home is a small bungalow with two bedrooms, two bathrooms and a communal lounge and dining kitchen with an enclosed garden. There were two people living at the home at the time of our inspection.

The registered provider was in breach of a condition of their registration because they had not ensured their regulated activity was managed by an individual who was registered as a manager and CQC is considering an appropriate regulatory response to this. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run

People told us they felt safe living at Cherry Garth. The manager and staff were aware of relevant procedures to help keep people safe and staff could describe signs that may indicate someone was at risk of abuse or harm. Staff had received safeguarding training.

Risks to people had been assessed and measures put into place to reduce risk.

Some improvements were required in relation to keeping the home and equipment safe, such as portable appliance testing. The manager arranged for this immediately, once this had been highlighted at the inspection.

Medicines were not managed safely. Accurate records were not kept in relation to medicines and there were discrepancies in the information in medication administration records.

Not all staff had received food hygiene training, despite being involved in the preparation of food. There was a lack of evidence of regular staff supervision taking place.

The registered provider acted in accordance with the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and associated Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

We observed staff to be caring and supportive and people told us staff were kind. Staff encouraged people to be independent.

Care records were person centred and reviewed regularly and included the goals and aims of the person. Care and support was provided in line with people’s care plans.

Audits were not robust and did not identify some areas which were identified for improvement at the inspection. There was no registered manager in post and management arrangements had meant there had been a lack of day to day management within the service.

You can see what action we told the provider to take, in relation to the breaches of regulations we found, at the back of the full version of the report.