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Inspection carried out on 3 October 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Colliers House is a care home which provides support for up to 12 people. At the time of our visit, 11 people were using the service. These are young people with complex physical needs, learning disabilities and autism. Colliers House comprises of three adjacent large properties situated in a residential area and people live in flats within these.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

The service applied the principles and values of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These ensure that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes that include control, choice and independence.

The outcomes for people using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. People's support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent.

Staff were caring in their approach and had good relationships with people. Promoting independence was a core goal of the service and people were encouraged to improve their daily life skills to develop further.

There were enough staff to ensure people were safe. Where risks associated with people's health and wellbeing had been identified, plans were in place to manage those risks whilst ensuring people could remain independent.

Staff understood their responsibility to safeguard people from harm and knew how to report concerns. Systems were in place to ensure any potential safeguarding concerns were prevented.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; systems supported this practice.

People received care which was responsive to their individual needs. Staff knew people well and had a good understanding of how to support them. Care records provided staff with person centred information in relation to people’s backgrounds, interests and individual health needs.

Staff encouraged people to maintain a balanced diet and respected their individual choices. The provider and staff team worked with external healthcare professionals to ensure people's health and wellbeing was maintained.

A registered manager was in post. Positive feedback was received in relation to the management of the service and the improvements that had been made recently. People and staff were actively involved in, and had opportunities to feedback about, the running of the service.

Quality checks were carried out to monitor the service, and some identified where improvements could be made. However, some checks had not been completed correctly by staff which meant opportunities to improve care could be missed.

Medicines were administered correctly, and staff had received training in relation to this, however improvements were required around some of the systems and audits.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

The service was rated as Good (published 4 May 2017).

Why we inspected

The inspection was prompted in part due to concerns received about poor staff practices. A decision was made for us to inspect and examine those risks.

The inspection was also prompted by notification of a specif

Inspection carried out on 7 March 2017

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 7 March 2017 and was unannounced.

The provider of Colliers House is registered to provide accommodation with personal care. At the time of this inspection 11 people with a range of needs which included learning disabilities, autism and mental health needs.

Colliers House is made up of three houses. Four people lived in the main house where the registered manager’s office was situated. The other two houses each consisted of four one bedroom flats where people were supported by staff to live as independently as possible.

There was a registered manager in post. As part of its conditions of registration, this provider is required to have a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the home is run.

As a result of concerns brought to our attention and due to incidents reported to us we brought forward the date of our planned inspection at Colliers House.

People were supported by staff who knew how to recognise and report any concerns so people were kept safe from harm. The registered manager worked alongside the local authority so any concerns raised were investigated and took appropriate action to protect people. Staff were recruited safely and staffing levels ensured people were safe and received the care and support they needed in the way they preferred. People received their prescribed medicines by staff who had been trained to do this safely.

Staff were provided with the training they needed to meet people’s specific needs and an active training programme was in place to address identified training needs. Staff had regular one to one meetings to reflect on and develop their practice.

Staff respected people's rights to make their own decisions and choices about their care and treatment. People's permission was sought by staff before they helped them with anything. Staff made sure people understood what was being said to them by using a range of communication methods. When people did not have the capacity to make their own specific decisions these were made in their best interests by people who knew them well and were authorised to do this.

Staff met people's care and support needs in the least restrictive way. Where it was felt people received care and support to keep them safe and well which may be restricting their liberty applications had been made. These actions made sure people's liberty was not being unlawfully restricted.

Staff had been supported to assist people in the right way which included helping people to eat and drink enough to stay healthy and well. People had been assessed for any risks associated with eating and drinking and care plans had been created for those people who were identified as being at risk. People were supported to access health and social care services to maintain and promote their health and well-being.

Staff cared for people in a kind, warm and friendly way. Staff promoted what people could do and supported people with dignity when they needed assistance. People's right to private space and time to be alone and with their relatives was accepted and respected.

Staff provided the care which had been planned to meet people’s needs and had a good degree of knowledge about their individual choices, decisions and preferences. Staff offered people the opportunity to do things for fun and interest. There were arrangements in place for receiving and resolving complaints which took into account people's individual needs.

The registered manager was approachable and supportive of staff and took account of good practice guidance to improve the care people received. The views of people who lived at the home, relatives and staff were being established to develop the

Inspection carried out on 4 November 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 4 November 2015. The inspection was announced 48 hours before we visited to establish if people living at the service would be available to talk with us. This was the first inspection of the service since they registered with us.

Colliers House is registered to provide accommodation and personal care within a residential setting to a maximum of twelve people. There were eleven people using the service at the time of our inspection. This included people with a learning disability, autism and mental health needs.

The service consists of three units. Four people lived in the main unit where the registered manager’s office was situated. The other two units each consisted of four one bedroom flats where people were supported by staff to live as independently as possible.

A requirement of the provider’s registration is that they have a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. At the time of our inspection there was a registered manager at the service.

People and their relatives told us they felt safe at Colliers House, and staff treated them well. The registered manager and staff understood how to protect people they supported from abuse, and knew what procedures to follow to report any concerns. Staff had a good understanding of risks associated with people’s care needs and knew how to support them.

There were enough staff at Colliers House to support people safely and provide people with support in the home and whilst outside of the home. Recruitment procedures made sure staff were of a suitable character to care for people.

Medicines were stored and administered safely, and people received their medicines as prescribed. People were supported to attend health care appointments when they needed to and received healthcare that supported them to maintain their wellbeing.

People and their relatives thought staff were kind and responsive to people’s needs, and people’s privacy and dignity was respected.

Management and staff understood the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS), and supported people in line with these principles. People were supported to make everyday decisions themselves, which helped them to maintain their independence. When they were not able to make these decisions relatives and healthcare professionals were consulted for their advice and input.

People were supported to pursue their hobbies and interests both within and outside of the home. Activities were arranged according to people’s individual preferences, needs and abilities. People who lived at Colliers House were encouraged to maintain links with friends and family who visited them at the home when people invited them. They were also supported to visit their relatives.

There was a good transition process to support people moving into Colliers House. Relatives were involved to help reduce any anxieties. Detailed action plans were devised to assist transition into the home in order to ensure people’s care and support needs were met.

Staff, people and their relatives felt the registered manager was kind, supportive and promoted an open culture within the home. Positive communication was encouraged and any identified concerns were acted upon by the registered manager, operations manager and the provider.

Staff were supported by the registered manager through regular team meetings, direct observation and supervision sessions. Staff felt their training and induction supported them to meet the needs of people they cared for. The registered manager felt well supported by the provider who visited regularly.

People and their relatives told us they knew how to make a complaint if they needed to. The provider monitored complaints to identify any trends and patterns, and made changes to the service in response to complaints.

The provider carried regular audits to check the quality of care people received.