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Archived: Care Outlook (Battersea) Good

This service was previously registered at a different address - see old profile

This service is now registered at a different address - see new profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 12 April 2017

During a routine inspection

We conducted an announced inspection of Care Outlook on 12 and 13 April 2017. We gave the provider 48 hours’ notice to ensure the key people we needed to speak with were available. At our last comprehensive inspection on 9 December 2014 we found the provider was meeting the regulations we checked.

Care Outlook provides care and support to people living in their own homes. There were 112 people using the service when we visited.

There was a registered manager at the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Risk assessments and care plans contained enough information for care staff. All records were reviewed within six months or sooner if people’s needs changed.

Care staff assisted people to take their medicines safely. Care workers told us they had completed medicines administration training and understood how to safely administer medicines.

Safeguarding adults from abuse procedures were robust and staff understood how to safeguard people they supported. Staff had received safeguarding adults training and were able to explain the possible signs of abuse as well as the correct procedure to follow if they had concerns.

Staff demonstrated a good level of knowledge about their responsibilities under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. However, care records did not always demonstrate that people were provided with care in accordance with their valid consent.

Staff demonstrated an understanding of people’s life histories and current circumstances and supported people to meet their individual needs in a caring way. Care records contained enough information about people’s needs and preferences.

Recruitment procedures ensured that only staff who were suitable, worked within the service. There was a detailed induction programme for new staff, which prepared them for their role.

Care workers were provided with appropriate training to help them carry out their duties. Care workers received regular supervision and appraisals of their performance. There were enough staff employed to meet people’s needs and visits were appropriately arranged to ensure people’s needs were met.

Care workers supported people to maintain a balanced nutritious diet where this formed part of the package of care being provided to them. People were supported effectively with their health needs, when needed and were supported to access a range of healthcare professionals.

People using the service and staff gave positive feedback about the registered manager and told us they provided feedback about the service. They knew how to make complaints and told us they felt listened to and there was a complaints policy and procedure in place.

The organisation had effective systems in place to monitor the quality of the service. The registered manager reviewed various areas of the service on a regular basis. Information was reported to the CQC as required.

Inspection carried out on 09/12/2014

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 09 December 2014 and was announced. The provider was given 48 hours’ notice because the location provides a domiciliary care service; we needed to be sure that someone would be in.

Care Outlook (Battersea) provides personal care for people living in Battersea, in the Borough of Wandsworth.

There was a registered manager at the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People that we spoke with did not raise any concerns about their safety. The provider took appropriate steps to try and ensure people were kept safe through delivering safeguarding training to staff and following correct procedures when concerns were raised. The provider took action when concerns were raised and worked with other agencies to ensure people were kept safe.

Recruitment checks were completed prior to care workers starting work at the service including criminal record checks. They completed a comprehensive induction and shadowed more experienced staff before they started to deliver personal care independently. The induction covered a number of areas including the values of the organisation and their responsibilities as a care worker. They were given training in relation to maintaining safety at work and meeting the needs of people using the service. They were provided with ongoing training thereafter to ensure they were kept up to date with current practice. Staff told us they received appropriate training and felt well supported through regular supervision.

A quality monitoring officer completed individual risk assessments for people using the service and these were reviewed regularly. They included the action staff needed to take to minimise the risk. Each person had a medicines risk assessment and a fire safety risk assessment. The provider took a proactive approach to managing risks. For example, staff supported people to have smoke alarms fitted in their homes.

People’s dietary needs and preferences were recorded in their care plans. Care workers told us they notified the manager if they had any concerns about people’s health and we saw evidence of this in people’s care plans. We also saw that referrals had been made to people’s GPs following a fall or when a change in their needs was noted.

Where possible, people were given regular care workers which helped them to develop caring relationships. There was evidence that language and cultural requirements were considered when allocating care workers to people using the service. Staff told us about the importance of respecting people’s privacy and dignity in relation to carrying out personal care for people. People were given the choice of whether they wanted a male or female carer and the provider respected this.

People’s needs were assessed regularly to ensure their needs could be met. An initial assessment was completed from which care and support plans were developed. A six week review was held to ensure the support needs of people were being met.

The provider took action when formal complaints were received to try and improve the service. Appropriate action was taken, for example more training delivered if required. However, informal concerns were not captured as effectively by the provider.

Robust quality monitoring visits took place which included unannounced spot checks, observations, monitoring of time keeping and learning from complaints.