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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 29 March 2017

We carried out this inspection on 13 February 2017. The inspection was unannounced. 374 – 376 Winchester Road provides accommodation and support for up to eight people who have a learning disability or autism. There were six people living at the home when we carried out the inspection.

The home was last inspected on13 July 2016, when we found breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014 and issued warning notices telling the provider they must make improvements. We subsequently inspected the service on 21 November 2016 to check that improvements had been made and the warning notices had been complied with. At that inspection, we found that improvements had been made. At this inspection, we found that improvements had been sustained and the service was providing care in line with the regulations.

A registered manager was not in post at the time of our inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The service was currently in the process of registering the manager for the home.

Staff spoke highly of the manager and told us they had made changes around the home, which had a positive effect on the safety, efficiency and effectiveness of the service provided. The manager promoted an open door policy, where people or staff were encouraged to come to them with issues, concerns or suggestions.

There were systems and processes in place to monitor the safety of the home and the quality of care. The manager carried out regular auditing and checking of staff competence in their role, then shared feedback and learning to the staff in supervisions, team meetings and training sessions. Incidents were used to enhance learning, understanding, leading to changes to prevent them re-occurring.

The home had a system in place to safely manage people’s medicines. Where people required medicines for pain or anxiety, clear plans were in place to support staff to understand when they were needed. People had access to healthcare services were supported to follow a diet in line with their preferences and dietary requirements.

People’s care plans were detailed and person centred, identifying steps staff needed to take to maintain people’s safety, keep them active, monitor their health and wellbeing and uphold their dignity. Staff were knowledgeable about people, had received relevant training and possessed the skills required in order to effectively support people and keep them safe.

People were supported to lead an active life in the community and staffing had been arranged to enable them to follow their arranged activities as planned. People were encouraged to build their practical skills and participate in the upkeep and cleanliness of their home environment.

Staff sought consent from people before providing care and support. People’s ability to make decisions was assessed in line with legal requirements, ensuring their rights were protected and their liberty was not unlawfully restricted. Decisions were taken in the best interests of people.

A complaints policy was in place. The manager investigated issues and concerns, reflected on feedback and ensured they fed back findings to people who made complaints. The provider informed CQC about important events that happened within the home, in line with regulatory requirements.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 29 March 2017

The service was safe.

Systems were in place for the safe management of people’s medicines.

Staff received training in safeguarding and understood how to keep people safe.

Individual risks to people were assessed and managed safely.

Infection control procedures resulted in the home being clean and a safe environment.

There were sufficient suitably qualified staff to meet people’s needs.

Effective

Good

Updated 29 March 2017

The service was effective.

Staff received training and supervision to support them to be effective in their role.

Staff sought consent from people before providing care and followed legislation designed to protect people’s rights.

People had access to healthcare services.

People followed a diet in line with their preferences and dietary requirements.

Caring

Good

Updated 29 March 2017

The service was caring.

Staff promoted people’s dignity and privacy.

Staff were knowledgeable about people and cared for them with dedication.

Responsive

Good

Updated 29 March 2017

The service was responsive.

Care plans were person centred and provided guidance to monitor people’s health and wellbeing.

There was a complaints policy in place.

The home provided accommodation for people who required respite services.

People pursued a varied range of activities of their choosing.

Well-led

Good

Updated 29 March 2017

The service was well led.

The manager had made changes to the running of the home, which fostered a positive culture within the service.

Effective auditing systems were in place to monitor the safety of the home and the quality of the care.

Incidents were analysed to look for triggers, causes and ways to reduce future occurrences.

The manager had applied to register with CQC and their application was being processed.