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79 Malmesbury Road Outstanding

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 19 February 2018

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 26 and 27 February 2018 and was announced. We gave the provider 48 hours’ notice of the inspection. We did this to ensure people and key staff would be available at the service. The service provides accommodation and support for up to five people with learning disabilities and complex mental health needs. There were 5 people living in the home at the time of this inspection.

At our last we rated the service outstanding. At this inspection we found evidence continued to support the rating of outstanding and because of this the report is in a shorter format.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The provider had a very ‘hands on’, active approach and presence within the service, with people who lived at the home, relatives, the local public and staff. He was constantly referred to us with praise and always by his first name. For the purpose of the report we will refer to him as the provider.

The views of people were sought in a way that was informal, relaxed and tailored to their individual needs. This demonstrated a person centred ethos and creativity and, ensured any barriers to effective communication were overcome. They used a sensitive approach that respected people's cultural backgrounds and mental health needs. We found during our visit that spending time with people and talking about things important to them, was an approach they were more familiar and comfortable with and enabled us to assess their experience of the service more effectively than asking more direct questions. Staff supported this and introduced us to everyone individually and explained why we were visiting.

People very were confident in their surroundings and with each other. The atmosphere was buoyant and people were excited to welcome us into their home and share their experiences. Staff were knowledgeable about everyone they supported and it was evident they had built up relationships based on trust and respect for each other. People experienced a lifestyle that met their individual expectations, capacity and preferences. There was an ethos of empowering people wherever possible and providing facilities where independence would be encouraged and celebrated.

Everyone involved in this inspection demonstrated a genuine passion for the roles they performed and individual responsibilities. They wanted to ensure that those living at the service felt safe and valued. Staff embraced new initiatives with the support of the provider, registered manager and colleagues. They continued to look at the needs of people who used the service and ways to improve these so that people felt empowered to make positive changes.

The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.”

Inspection carried out on 17 and 21 April 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on the afternoon of the 17 April and the morning of the 21 April 2015. The provider was given notice because the location was a small care home for adults who are often out during the day; we needed to be sure that someone would be in.

Seventy-nine Malmesbury Road is one of three homes belonging to the provider, Cocklebury Farmhouse Homes Limited. Malmesbury Road provides accommodation and care for adults who have a learning disability, mental health or more complex needs.

Support is designed for people who have previously experienced difficulties in being able to live within a community environment. Therefore, care is generally provided for a long-term period and this benefits people who require higher levels of guidance and support.

The service had a registered manager who was responsible for the day to day operation of the home. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The registered manager was present on the day of the inspection. The provider is also a registered manager of the service.

Malmesbury Road is registered to provide care and support for up to three people. At the time of our inspection an extension was being built onto the home. The provider had applied to the Care Quality Commission to increase the number of places from three to five.

People and their families praised the staff and registered manager at Malmesbury Road for their kindness and the support given to people and families alike. People had developed caring relationships with staff and were treated with dignity and respect. People had been supported to become as independent as they were able to be. People told us they enjoyed a very high quality of life and relatives and staff agreed.

People’s rights were recognised, respected and promoted. Staff were knowledgeable about the rights of people to make their own choices, this was reflected in the way the care plans were written and the way in which staff supported and encouraged people to make decisions when delivering care and support.

The care records demonstrated that people’s care needs had been assessed and considered their emotional, health and social care needs. People’s care needs were regularly reviewed to ensure they received appropriate and safe care, particularly if their care needs changed. Staff worked closely with health and social care professionals for guidance and support around people’s care needs.

Staff had received training in how to recognise and report abuse. There was an open and transparent culture in the home and all staff were clear about how to report any concerns they had. Staff were confident that the registered manager would respond appropriately. People we spoke with knew how to make a complaint if they were not satisfied with the service they received.

There were systems in place to ensure that staff received appropriate support, guidance and training through supervision and an annual appraisal. Staff received training which was considered mandatory by the provider and in addition, more specific training based upon people’s needs.