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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 30 December 2016

The inspection took place on 17 and 23 November 2016 and was unannounced.

Kensington Lodge is a residential care home registered to provide accommodation and care for up to 18 older people with a variety of health needs, including people living with dementia and/or mental health needs. At the time of our inspection, 17 people were living at the home. Kensington Lodge is situated in a residential area of Rustington, with access to the seafront, local amenities and town centre. Except for one shared room, all bedrooms are of single occupancy with the majority have en-suite facilities. Communal areas comprise a large sitting room, quiet lounge and dining area, with easy access to outside space and patio area.

A registered manager was in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People said they were safe living at the home and staff had been trained to recognise the signs of potential harm and abuse; they knew what action to take. Risks to people were identified, assessed and managed appropriately and were updated on a monthly basis or as needed. Staffing levels were sufficient to meet people’s needs and keep them safe. New staff were vetted before they commenced employment to ensure they were safe to work in a health care role. Medicines were managed appropriately and medication audits and staff competency to administer medicines were carried out.

Staff were trained in a range of areas to provide effective care to people. New staff completed the Care Certificate, a universally recognised qualification. Staff had regular supervision meetings and annual appraisals; they attended staff meetings. Staff had received training in the Mental Capacity Act (2005) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards and understood the requirements and their responsibilities to people under this legislation. People were supported to have sufficient to eat and drink and had a choice of food from a menu planned over a four weekly cycle. People had access to a range of healthcare professionals and services. The home had been adapted to meet the needs of people living with dementia.

People were looked after by kind and caring staff who knew them well. Relatives spoke highly of the staff and the management team. People were encouraged to be involved in all aspects of their care. When people became upset, anxious or distressed, staff supported them in a comforting and sensitive manner. People were treated with dignity and respect.

People’s care needs and the support they required from staff were documented in their care plans which were reviewed monthly. Activities were structured and included music and themed activities delivered by external entertainers, as well as activities organised by staff. Advice had been sought from the local authority on meaningful and stimulating activities for people living with dementia. Complaints were investigated, responded to and managed appropriately.

People and their relatives were involved in developing the service and their feedback was obtained through formal questionnaires. Staff were also asked for their views and felt supported by the management team. Quality was integral to the service’s approach and a number of compliments had been received from relatives and friends. A range of audits was in place to monitor and measure the quality of the service overall.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 30 December 2016

The service was safe.

People told us they felt safe living at the home. Staff had been trained to recognise the signs of potential abuse and knew what action to take if they suspected abuse was taking place.

Risks to people were identified, assessed and managed safely.

Staffing levels were sufficient to meet people’s needs.

Medicines were managed safely.

Effective

Good

Updated 30 December 2016

The service was effective.

Staff had completed training in a range of areas and received supervision and annual appraisals.

Consent to care and treatment was sought in line with legislation and guidance. Staff understood the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 and put this into practice.

People were supported to have sufficient to eat and drink and to maintain a balanced diet.

People had access to a range of healthcare professionals and support.

The environment was homely and had been adapted, as far as possible, to meet the needs of people living with dementia.

Caring

Good

Updated 30 December 2016

The service was caring.

People were looked after by kind and caring staff who knew them well.

People were encouraged to express their views and to be involved in all aspects of their care. Relatives were involved in care planning.

People were treated with dignity and respect.

Responsive

Good

Updated 30 December 2016

The service was responsive.

Care plans provided detailed, comprehensive information about people’s care needs and guidance for staff on how they should be supported.

A range of activities was in place, including external entertainers who provided themed activities.

Complaints were managed appropriately and to the satisfaction of the complainant.

Well-led

Good

Updated 30 December 2016

The service was well led.

Relatives and visitors spoke highly of the care provided at Kensington Lodge. Their feedback was obtained through questionnaires and staff were also asked for their views about the home.

Staff felt supported by the management team and that they were approachable and accessible.

A range of audits monitored and measured the quality of the service delivery and home overall.