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London Borough of Greenwich - 58 The Village Good

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 22 November 2018

This unannounced comprehensive inspection took place on 19 September 2018. London Borough of Greenwich – 58 The Village provides care and support for people living in a care home. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. 58 The village provides accommodation and personal care to a maximum of six adults and older adults with learning disabilities in one adaptable building. At the time of this inspection five people were living at the home.

The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.

At our last inspection on 27 April 2016 we rated the service good. At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of good and there was no evidence or information from our inspection and ongoing monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The provider had safeguarding policies and procedures and staff knew of their responsibility to protect people from abuse. Risk to people had been identified, assessed and had appropriate risk management plans in place. People’s medicines were managed safely. There were appropriate recruitment practices in place and there were sufficient numbers of suitable staff to support people’s needs. People were protected from the risk of infection because staff followed appropriate infection control practices. Accidents and incidents were reported, recorded and monitored to drive improvements.

People’s needs were regularly assessed to ensure they would be met. People were supported to maintain good health and had enough nutritious food in sufficient amounts to eat. People were supported to use healthcare services and the staff worked in partnership with health and social care professionals to provide a joined-up service. People’s individual needs were met by the design, decoration and adaptation of the home. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. Staff were supported through induction, training, supervision and appraisals to ensure they delivered an effective service.

People were supported by staff that were kind, respectful and caring towards them. People were involved in making decisions about their care and support. People’s privacy and dignity was respected and their independence promoted. People’s communications needs were assessed and met and were supported to use assistive technologies to promote their communication and independence where required.

Each person had a care plan that provided staff with guidance on how their needs should be met. Staff understood the Equality Act and supported people in a caring way. People were supported to participate in activities that interested them and maintained relationships that were important to them. The provider had a complaint policy and people knew how to make a complaint if they were unhappy. People were supported to plan for their end of life care needs and wishes.

There was a registered manager in post who notified CQC of significant events that occurred at the service. The provider displayed their last CQC inspection rating at the home to ensure people had access to this information. There were appropriate monitoring systems in place to assess and monitor the quality of the service. People, their relatives, staff and health and social care professional views were sought to improve on the service delivery. The provider worked in partnership with key organisations to plan and deliver an effective service. There were systems in place which supported continuous learning.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 22 November 2018

The service remains good.

Effective

Good

Updated 22 November 2018

The service remains good.

Caring

Good

Updated 22 November 2018

The service remains good.

Responsive

Good

Updated 22 November 2018

The service remains good.

Well-led

Good

Updated 22 November 2018

The service remains good.