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Olney Care Services Limited Good

This service was previously registered at a different address - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 17 July 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service:

Olney Care Services is a domiciliary care agency. The service provides personal care to people living in their own homes in the community. At the time of our inspection 69 people were receiving personal care.

Not everyone who used the service received personal care. CQC only inspects where people receive personal care. This is help with tasks related to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do we also consider any wider social care provided.

People’s experience of using this service:

People valued their relationships with staff and felt they often went ‘the extra mile’ which made them feel valued. Staff treated people with extreme kindness, compassion and respect. People were supported to express their views and be involved in making decisions about their care. Staff were highly motivated and expressed determination to overcome any obstacles so that people could achieve exceptional outcomes. People were fully supported to express their views and be involved, in making decisions about how they wanted their care to be provided. Staff completely always maintained people’s privacy and dignity and treated them with respect.

People received safe care and were protected against avoidable harm, neglect and discrimination. Risks to people’s safety were assessed and strategies were put in place to reduce the risks. Staff were appropriately recruited and there were enough staff to provide care and support to people to meet their needs.

Where the provider took on the responsibility, people's medicines were safely managed. Systems were in place to control and prevent the spread of infection.

People’s needs, and choices were assessed before they received a care package. Staff received an induction and ongoing training that enabled them to have the skills and knowledge to provide effective care.

People were supported to maintain good nutrition and hydration. Staff supported people to live healthier lives and access healthcare services when required.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People and their families were fully involved in the care planning and reviews of their care. The provider had a complaints procedure which was accessible to people using the service. This was used effectively when complaints were received by the service.

The service had good governance systems in place to ensure all aspects of the service delivery were continuously assessed and monitored. The service worked in partnership with outside agencies.

Rating at last inspection:

The last rating for this service was Good. The last report was published on 24 March 2017.

Why we inspected:

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up:

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Inspection carried out on 23 February 2017

During a routine inspection

Olney Care Services Limited is a domiciliary care agency providing personal care and support to people living in their own homes. The service provides support with personal care, medication, meal preparation, domestic tasks and bespoke services agreed with individuals. At the time of our inspection they were providing a service to 63 people in and around the town of Olney in Buckinghamshire.

This comprehensive inspection took place on 23 and 24 February 2017, and was announced. At the last comprehensive inspection in February 2015, we asked the provider to take action to make improvements to the completion of training, professional development, supervision and appraisal and associated records. We conducted a focused inspection of the service in September 2015 to see if the service had made the improvements stated in their action plan. We found that the required action had been completed.

The service has two managers who share ownership of the agency, one of whom is the registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us that they felt safe and were supported by consistent, reliable staff. Staff understood their responsibilities with regards to safeguarding people and they had received relevant training. There were systems in place to safeguard people from the risk of possible harm.

Accidents and incidents were reported promptly, analysed by senior staff and action taken to reduce reoccurrence. Personalised risk assessments that gave staff guidance on how individual risks to people could be minimised were completed and updated regularly.

The service had robust recruitment procedures in place. There were sufficient staff to meet the care and support needs of people and an effective system to manage the rotas and schedule people’s care visits.

There were effective systems in place for the management of medicines. People were supported to take their medicines as prescribed, where assessed as required. Regular audits of medicine records and competency checks of staff were completed by senior staff.

Staff were skilled and competent in their roles and were supported by way of spot checks, supervisions and appraisals. These were consistently completed for all staff and used to improve and give feedback on performance.

People were supported, where required, with their meals and the preparation of food. People were supported to maintain their health and well-being and accessed the services of health professionals.

Staff were kind, caring and friendly. They provided care in a respectful manner and maintained people’s dignity. People were involved in making decisions about their care and their consent was sought. Positive relationships existed between people and staff.

People’s needs had been assessed and they had been involved in planning their care and deciding in which way their care was provided. Each person had a detailed care plan which was reflective of their needs and had been reviewed at regular intervals. Staff were knowledgeable about the people they were supporting and provided personalised care.

People, their relatives and staff knew who to raise concerns to. The provider had a robust process for handling complaints and concerns. These were recorded, investigated, responded to and included actions to prevent recurrence.

There were effective quality assurance processes. Feedback on the service provided was encouraged and an action plan had been developed to address any issues raised within audit processes, surveys and general information received, with a view to continuously improve the service.

There was an open culture. People, staff and relatives spoke highly of the managers and there was positive leadership in pl

Inspection carried out on 03 September 2015

During an inspection looking at part of the service

This inspection took place on the 03 September and was announced.

During our previous inspection on 24 February 2015, we found that one of the regulations relating to care, welfare and records, was not being met.

Suitable arrangements were not in place to ensure that persons employed for the purpose of carrying on the regulated activity received appropriate training, professional development, supervision and appraisal.

This was a breach of Regulation 23 (1) (a) of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2010, which corresponds to regulation 18 (2) (a) of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) 2014.

We asked the provider to submit an action plan to tell us how they would meet this regulation in the future. During this inspection we returned to see if the service had made the improvements they stated in their action plan. We found that the provider was now meeting this regulation.

This report only covers our findings in relation to those requirements. You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection, by selecting 'all reports' link for ‘Olney Care Services Limited’ on our website at www.cqc.org.uk

Olney Care Services Limited is a domiciliary care agency providing in-home care for older people and adults with a range of health conditions, such as dementia, learning disabilities and mental health needs. The service provides support with personal care, medication, meal preparation, domestic tasks and bespoke services agreed with individuals. At the time of our visit there were 54 people receiving care in and around the town of Olney in Buckinghamshire.

Systems had been put into place to ensure staff received the training and development they needed. A new training matrix had been produced to allow the provider to identify each staff member’s training needs and staff had all received appraisal and supervision sessions since our last inspection. Plans were in place for continued training and development for staff and future supervisions were planned into the staff rota.

As the training and supervisions systems had only recently been improved, we were unable to tell whether or not they were effective in the long term.

This inspection took place on the 03 September and was announced.

During our previous inspection on 24 February 2015, we found that one of the regulations relating to care, welfare and records, was not being met.

Suitable arrangements were not in place to ensure that persons employed for the purpose of carrying on the regulated activity received appropriate training, professional development, supervision and appraisal.

This was a breach of Regulation 23 (1) (a) of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2010, which corresponds to regulation 18 (2) (a) of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) 2014.

We asked the provider to submit an action plan to tell us how they would meet this regulation in the future. During this inspection we returned to see if the service had made the improvements they stated in their action plan. We found that the provider was now meeting this regulation.

This report only covers our findings in relation to those requirements. You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection, by selecting 'all reports' link for ‘Olney Care Services Limited’ on our website at www.cqc.org.uk

Olney Care Services Limited is a domiciliary care agency providing in-home care for older people and adults with a range of health conditions, such as dementia, learning disabilities and mental health needs. The service provides support with personal care, medication, meal preparation, domestic tasks and bespoke services agreed with individuals. At the time of our visit there were 54 people receiving care in and around the town of Olney in Buckinghamshire.

Systems had been put into place to ensure staff received the training and development they needed. A new training matrix had been produced to allow the provider to identify each staff member’s training needs and staff had all received appraisal and supervision sessions since our last inspection. Plans were in place for continued training and development for staff and future supervisions were planned into the staff rota.

As the training and supervisions systems had only recently been improved, we were unable to tell whether or not they were effective in the long term.

Inspection carried out on 24 February 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on the 24 February 2015 and was announced.

Olney Care Services Limited is a domiciliary care agency providing in-home care for the elderly and adults with a range of health conditions, such as dementia, learning disabilities and mental health needs. The service provides support with personal care, medication, meal preparation, domestic tasks and bespoke services agreed with individuals.

At the time of our visit there were 48 people receiving care in and around the town of Olney in Buckinghamshire. There was a team of 13 carers which included the two owners/managers, one of whom is the registered manager for the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were protected from abuse and felt safe with the service being provided to them. Staff were knowledgeable about risks of abuse and the different forms it could take. Systems were in place to report abuse and act to reduce the likelihood of it re-occurring.

There were appropriate numbers of staff employed to meet people’s needs and provide a flexible service. Safe and effective recruitment practices were followed.

There were suitable arrangements for the safe storage, management and disposal of medication.

Staff received regular training, however we found that a number of courses had not been completed by all staff others were over-due refresher training.

People were asked for consent before being supported by staff, however we did not find use of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 or sufficient levels of training and understanding regarding this piece of legislation.

People told us their health care needs were met and staff treated them with kindness, dignity and respect.

The service listened to what people said about the care they received and took active steps to encourage feedback from each person and their families.

There was a positive and open culture at the service. The registered manager worked closely with the other co-owner to ensure people received good care.

Effective systems of audits, surveys and reviews were used to good effect in monitoring performance and managing risks. The service had identified areas for development and invested time and money into improving their service delivery.