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Inspection carried out on 26 June 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

iCare Living Ltd are registered to deliver personal care. They provide Domiciliary care and Supported living services to older and young people living in their own homes. People who used the service may have a range of support needs related to old age and/or dementia, misuse of drugs and/or alcohol, an eating disorder, physical disability, sensory impairment, learning disabilities or autistic spectrum disorder or mental health issues. At the time of our inspection six people were using the supported living service and were being supported in their own homes.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

Management had taken onboard the concerns raised in an anonymous complaint and used the information to make positive changes to the service. Staff were on board with the changes being introduced and felt they were being listened to by management.

People were supported by a group of staff who had received training in how to recognise signs of abuse. Where concerns of a safeguarding nature arose, these concerns were reported and acted on appropriately.

Staff were aware of the risks to the people they supported and the actions they should take to keep people safe from harm. Staff were provided with the most up to date information regarding people’s care needs and shared information with each other in order to provide safe and effective care.

Staff felt well trained and new training opportunities were provided to them. Staff received regular supervision and were provided with the opportunity to raise any concerns they may have in a variety of ways.

A variety of audits were in place to provide management with oversight of the service. Individual lessons were learnt when things went wrong and action was taken where necessary.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People were supported to maintain their independence and access a variety of healthcare services to meet their needs.

The service applied the principles and values of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These ensure that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes that include control, choice and independence.

The outcomes for people using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. People's support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent.

Staff presented as caring individuals who were respectful of the people they supported. Staff obtained people’s consent prior to supporting them and were mindful of maintaining people’s privacy and dignity when offering support.

People were supported to maintain relationships that were important to them and to take part in activities that were of interest to them. People were supported by a group of staff who knew them well. Care records reflected how people wished to be supported and what was important to them.

Where complaints had been received, they were recorded and acted on appropriately. People and staff were confident they would be listened to, should they raise concerns.

For more detai

Inspection carried out on 23 September 2016

During a routine inspection

This announced inspection took place on 23 September 2016. The provider had a short amount of notice that an inspection would take place so we could ensure staff would be available to answer any questions we had and provide the information that we needed. Further phone contact was made with people using the services and their relatives on 28 and 30 September 2016 whose views we were unable to capture on the day of the inspection.

iCare Living Ltd are registered to deliver personal care. They provide Domicillary care and Supported living services to older and young people living in their own homes. People who used the service may have a range of support needs related to old age and/or dementia, misuse of drugs and/or alcohol, an eating disorder, physical disability, sensory impairment, learning disabilities or autistic spectrum disorder or mental health issues. At the time of our inspection five people were using the supported living service, but people using the Domicillary care service were not receiving the regulated activity of personal care.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People felt confident that the service provided to them was safe and protected them from harm. Assessments were undertaken to identify any issues that may put people using the service at risk and staff were well aware of these. The provider ensured consistency of the staff supporting people. Recruitment practices were comprehensive and ensured as far as possible that staff employed were safe to work with people. Medicines were managed effectively within the service and people received regular reviews of them by involved health care professionals.

Staff had access to a range of training to provide them with the level of skills and knowledge to deliver care safely and efficiently. The registered manager was responsive in sourcing specific training for staff when it was needed. Staff received an induction and regular supervision allowing them to understand their roles and responsibilities fully. People were supported to access the nutrition they needed and were monitored for any changes in their dietary intake. People were supported to access the health care support they needed to maintain their well-being. Staff established people’s consent before providing any care or support.

Care plans contained information about people’s abilities and preferences. Staff supported people in a way that maintained their privacy and dignity whilst encouraging them to remain as independent as possible. Management and staff demonstrated that they were dedicated to maintaining people’s well-being. People were complimentary about the caring nature of the staff who supported them.

Reviews were regularly organised and attended by people and staff with involved health care professionals to review their progress. The provider worked in conjunction with external professionals to ensure the best outcomes for people using the service. Care plans contained relevant personalised information, detailing how people’s needs should be met and had been reviewed and updated in a timely manner. People were supported to take part in meaningful activities of their choosing and with their personal likes and preferences in mind. Systems were in place for people to raise any concerns they had or to make a complaint.

Stakeholders were positive about their experience of the service and the effectiveness of management. The agency sought people’s feedback through questionnaires and meetings about the quality of the service. The provider monitored and undertook regular checks on the quality and safety of the service. Staff were involved in the develo