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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Outstanding

Updated 8 June 2018

The Check House is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. The Check House is registered to provide personal and nursing care. They provide care and support for older people living with frailty and for people living with dementia. The Check House accommodates 57 people in one adapted building which has been extended since our last inspection, which means there is additional communal space.

At our last inspection on December 2015, we rated the service as good overall, with requires improvement in the question linked to effective care. At this inspection we found evidence to support the continued rating of good in three key questions and outstanding in two key questions. From our on-going monitoring of the service there was no evidence that demonstrated serious risks or concerns.

There was a registered manager working at the home. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

There was a firm commitment to provide a creative array of activities to support people’s emotional and mental well-being. These enabled people to learn new skills. Staff recognised the importance of people's past lives, their interests and preferences, as well as providing them with an opportunity to be involved in new experiences. The contribution of pets to enhance people’s well-being was recognised; there were two house cats and several people had moved to the home with their dogs.

People had access to diverse activities and events both at the home and in the community, including dance therapy and physiotherapy. Examples included tea dances with a dance group, flower arranging, cake making and regular trips out in the service’s mini-bus to local places of interest such as cafes, museums, garden centres and the seafront. People were supported to have regular walks around the local area. People living with dementia were as involved with community activities as much as everyone else.

People living at and visiting the home praised the high standard of the food and its presentation. Catering staff worked alongside care staff to find food to meet people’s preferences and choices. They worked as a team with the outcome for the person at the forefront of their minds, discussing how to make choice meaningful for people living with dementia. Written feedback on an independent review website scored the home very highly recognising the “incredible caring staff”, the range of activities and the “very attentive care, both personal and medical”.

There was an on-going investment in the environment which reflected research and best practice to promote people’s independence and connection with their surroundings. The provider and registered manager recognised the effectiveness of the use of colour and contrast to ensure the adaptation, design and decoration of the environment was enabling, stimulating and suited to the needs of people living with dementia. Research influenced their decisions in how people were supported to navigate their way around the home.

People’s relationships and life experiences were respected and celebrated. This knowledge enabled staff to help people consider their wishes for their end of life care. Staff held a strong sense of pride in connection with the quality of end of life care. Staff knew people and who and what was important to them and significant events in their lives.

The registered manager acted as a strong role model for all the staff team and was accessible to people living, working and visiting the home. A visitor commented “Someone is always on hand if a

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 8 June 2018

The service remains Good.

Effective

Outstanding

Updated 8 June 2018

The service is now Outstanding.

The design of the premises showed a commitment to make people’s surroundings enabling and stimulating.

People were supported by committed staff who were trained to meet their emotional and health care needs. Staff received range of appropriate training to ensure people living at the home benefited from a skilled staff group.

Catering staff worked alongside care staff to provide people with attractively presented food which met their nutritional needs and gave them pleasure.

People were supported to access healthcare services to meet their needs. Staff ensured people were kept updated about health arrangements.

People were supported to make decisions about their care and support and staff obtained their consent before support was delivered. Staff knew their responsibility under the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards.

Caring

Good

Updated 8 June 2018

The service remains Good.

Responsive

Outstanding

Updated 8 June 2018

The service is now Outstanding.

People were encouraged to follow their interests and discover new ones.

There was a strong commitment for people to experience end of life care in an individualised and dignified way. Staff were responsive to people’s changing needs.

People’s individual care needs were assessed and care plans written in conjunction with individuals.

The management of complaints and concerns showed a commitment to improve the service and made people feel their opinions were valued.

Well-led

Good

Updated 8 June 2018

The service remains Good.