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Archived: Mears Homecare Limited - Nottingham Requires improvement

The provider of this service changed - see new profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 4 August 2016

During a routine inspection

We carried out an announced inspection of the service on 4, 8 and 9 August 2016. Mears Homecare Limited Nottingham is registered to provide personal care to people in their own homes. At the time of our inspection the service was providing the regulatory activity of personal care to 330 people.

A manager was in place and has been in post since May 2016. They were not yet registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). A registered manager is a person who has registered with the CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. An application for the manager to become registered has been received by the CQC. We will monitor the progress of the application.

Some people told us they were not satisfied with the punctuality of the staff, which could indicate sufficient staffing levels were not in place. Others told us the failure of staff to arrive on time sometimes made them feel unsafe. A new electronic monitoring system has been introduced to reduce the impact of this on people. People told us they did feel safe when the staff supported them within their homes.

The assessments of the risks people faced were not always completed in sufficient detail which increased the risk of people experiencing avoidable harm. Accidents and incidents were investigated, however the manager felt the number of reports received from staff did not reflect the size of the service. People told us their medicines were managed safely, however people’s medicines records were not always appropriately completed. A new competency assessment has been introduced by the manager to assist with reducing the number of medicines errors and improving staff performance.

Staff completed an induction prior to commencing their role and received regular supervision of their work. Staff felt supported by the manager and received regular training to enable them to support people effectively. People told us they did not always receive the same staff at their home.

The manager was aware of the principles of the Mental Capacity Act (2005); however the principles were not followed correctly when decisions were made for people.

Some people were supported with their food and drink and we found that care records did not always contain sufficient guidance on how to support people with their diet who were living with diabetes.

People’s day to day health needs were met by the staff, however the records used to support staff in doing so lacked detail and could increase the risk to people’s health. People told us where needed, staff supported them with contacting their GP or other healthcare professional.

People told us they thought the staff were kind and caring, treated them with respect and dignity and listened to and acted on their wishes. People felt able to contribute to decisions about their care. People’s independence was supported.

Staff discussed people’s needs with them prior to them starting to use the service. People’s care records had elements of person centred care. This included daily routines for staff to support people in the way they wanted them to. People’s care needs were reviewed.

People were provided with the information they needed if they wished to make a complaint. Some people felt their complaints were handled appropriately, however others did not. We saw a high volume of complaints were received in a two month period, April to May 2016 with regards to staff punctuality. This had improved in June and July 2016. The majority of complaints were responded to in line with the provider’s complaints policy, but we saw one had not been.

There had been a high turnover of managers at the service in the past 12 months. The current manager told us they wished to remain at the service and explained the processes they had in place to improve the

Inspection carried out on 14 May 2015

During a routine inspection

This was an announced inspection carried out on 14 May 2015.

There was a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Care UK Homecare Limited Nottingham provides care for people in their own homes. At the time of our inspection the service was providing care for 500 people. The service covered Mansfield, Ashfield and surrounding villages.

We found three breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. This was because the registered persons had not made reliable arrangements to consistently provide people with the assistance they needed to safely administer their medicines. In addition, they had not always provided staff at the right time to care for people. Although individual complaints had been investigated and quality checks had been completed they had not effectively identified and resolved these problems. You can see what action we told the registered persons to take at the back of the full version of this report.

Staff knew how to recognise and report any concerns so that people were kept safe from harm and abuse. People were helped to avoid having accidents and background checks had been completed before new staff were appointed.

Staff had received the training and guidance they needed to provide people with practical assistance including helping them to eat and drink enough. People had been assisted to receive all of the healthcare assistance they needed. Staff had ensured that people’s rights were protected because the Mental Capacity Act 2005 Code of Practice was followed when staff contributed to decisions that were made on their behalf.

People were treated with kindness, compassion and respect. Staff recognised people’s right to privacy, respected confidential information and promoted people’s dignity.

People had received all of the care they needed including people who had special communication needs and were at risk of becoming distressed. People had been consulted about the care they wanted to receive and they were supported to celebrate their diversity. Staff had offered people the opportunity to maintain their independence and to pursue their interests.

People who used the service had not been fully consulted about its development. However, the service was run in an open and inclusive way that encouraged staff to disclose any poor practice. In addition to this, people who used the service had benefited from staff being involved in good practice initiatives.