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Archived: North West Community Services (Merseyside) Good

The provider of this service changed - see new profile

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 24 September 2016

This inspection took place on 17 May 2016 and was announced. Northwest Community Services is a domiciliary care agency which provides care for people with complex care needs in their own homes. At the time of our inspection there were 156 people receiving a service and 171 staff providing a service.

There was a registered manager in post at the time of our inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Staff were knowledgeable regarding safeguarding and knew how to raise concerns when necessary. Risk assessments had been completed to ensure the environment was safe and in areas, such as mental health and mobility. There was an incidents policy and emergency plans in place to ensure the safety of people.

Medication risk assessments had been undertaken and medication management plans were in place for staff to follow. Medication awareness training was provided for staff.

Safe recruitment practices were clearly recorded in staff files to ensure only suitable staff were employed to work with vulnerable people. There were appropriate numbers of staff available to meet people’s needs.

People were supported by staff who knew them well. Care was person centred. Care plans included information regarding people’s social history, preferences and choices, which enabled staff to provide support based on the person’s wishes.

Staff told us they were well supported, received monthly supervision and an annual appraisal. Consent was sought from people in areas such as finances, administration of medicines and care planning. When people were unable to consent, the principles of The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) were followed to ensure care was provided in people’s best interest.

People were supported to engage in activities that were purposeful and meaningful to them and were supported to access advice and support from relevant health professionals in order to maintain their health and wellbeing.

People told us staff were kind and caring towards them and had a good understanding of how to communicate with people who used methods other than spoken English. People were appropriately referred to other health professionals to maintain their health and wellbeing.

People’s nutritional needs were being met by staff who supported them to shop and prepare meals based on individual preferences. Staff were aware of people’s needs from detailed information in the care plans we viewed and what support they required regarding their nutrition.

Quality assurance systems were in place to monitor the quality of the service, such as surveys, audit’s, spot checks and regular team meetings. People told us they were able to raise any issues with the manager and knew how to make a complaint should they need to. The registered manager was well respected and people we spoke with provided positive feedback about the management of the service.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 24 September 2016

The service was safe.

Recruitment processes were clearly documented demonstrating staff were recruited following safe practices.

Staff had a good understanding of safeguarding and knew what action to take to protect people from suspected abuse. Staff were aware of whistle blowing and of the service's whistleblowing policy. .

There were enough staff to meet people�s needs.

There were safe processes in place for managing medicines.

Effective

Good

Updated 24 September 2016

The service was effective.

People were supported by staff who were knowledgeable regarding their needs.

Staff were being supported via supervision and annual appraisal. Staff received an induction before they started work.

Consent was sought from people in line with the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

People were supported by staff to access external health care professionals. .

People�s nutritional needs were met by staff supported them with shopping, and meal preparation.

Caring

Good

Updated 24 September 2016

The service was caring.

Staff were knowledgeable about the people they cared for.

People�s respect and dignity were being maintained.

Staff were encouraging people to be as independent as possible.

People were involved in their care planning and their care plans we viewed provided detailed information about the person�s wishes.

Responsive

Good

Updated 24 September 2016

The service was responsive.

Care plans and risk assessments were being reviewed and information recorded to ensure the care plan reflected the care needs of the person.

Care was person centred. Care plans included information regarding people�s history, preferences and choices.

People were supported to engage in activities meaningful to them.

Complaints were being dealt with and investigated.

Well-led

Good

Updated 24 September 2016

The service was well led.

The registered manager promoted a culture of person centred practice with openness and of communication throughout the service.

Feedback regarding the management of the service was positive and people told us they were able to raise any issues with the manager.

Quality assurance systems were in place to monitor the quality of the service and encourage improvements.