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Ideal Community Care Solutions C.I.C Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 16 August 2017

During a routine inspection

The inspection site visit for Ideal Community Care Solutions C.I.C. took place on 16 August 2017 and was announced. On 31 August 2017 we contacted people that used the service and their relatives via telephone so that we could obtain their views of the support they received.

The service was part of a non-profit organisation based in Brigg called The Carer’s Support Centre, a charity to support carers in the community. The service, but not the charity, required registration with the Care Quality Commission, as it provided personal care and support to people living in their own homes whose carers needed a break. It provided a service to those that needed assistance because of living with old age, dementia, learning disability, autism, mental health, physical disability or sensory impairment. At the time of our inspection there were approximately 121 people receiving the service but only 59 of those received personal care. Other people received a sitting service, domestic calls or safety checks from Ideal Community Care Solutions C.I.C.

At the last inspection in April 2015 the service met all of the regulations we assessed and was rated as ‘Good’, but with one area (Safe) rated as ‘Requires Improvement.’ This was because risk assessments for some people were insufficiently developed to ensure that

accurate information was available to help assistants keep them safe from harm.

At this inspection we found the service remained ‘Good’ but with a different area (Well-led) rated as ‘Requires Improvement’. This was because the recommendations made in the ‘Safe’ section were now met, as risk assessments for people removed any risks of harm. However, there was no registered manager in post.

A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. A service that does not have a registered manager in place cannot receive a higher rating than 'Requires Improvement' in the well-led domain as the registered provider is in breach of the conditions of their registration. A new manager had been appointed and an application for them to become the registered manager was in progress.

We also found that the quality monitoring and assurance systems were insufficiently developed to always be effective. Therefore we made a recommendation regarding development of the quality assurance system. The quality monitoring and assurance systems included some audits of the service and issuing of satisfaction surveys. However, analysis of information was insufficiently developed as it had not resulted in action plans always being used to show how improvements would be made and there was no means of feeding back to stakeholders the findings and results of any action that was taken.

People told us they felt safe when supported by personal support assistants. The registered provider (known as provider in this report) had systems in place to address safeguarding concerns. Assistants were appropriately trained in safeguarding adults from abuse and understood their responsibilities in respect of recording and reporting incidents. Risks to people had been assessed and plans put in place to protect them from harm.

People’s living environments were assessed for any hazards to them or personal support assistants and risk assessments put in place if required to ensure everyone’s safety. Assistants’ numbers were sufficient to meet people’s need and rosters were used to record who was on duty. Recruitment practices were safe and ensured assistants were suitable to care for and support vulnerable people. We found that the management of medicines was safely carried out.

People were cared for and supported by qualified and competent assistants that received

Inspection carried out on 10, 13, and 14 April 2015

During a routine inspection

This unannounced inspection was carried out by one adult social care inspector over three days on 10, 13, and 14 April 2015. This was the first inspection of Ideal Community Care Solutions since it was registered in June 2014.

Ideal Community Care Solutions is a domiciliary care agency that is affiliated to the Carers Support Centre in Brigg. It is registered to provide personal care and support to the people of North Lincolnshire. Services range from sitting services for a few hours to 24 hours a day, and provision and personal care to people who use the service. People who used the service included; older people, people living with dementia, learning disabilities, mental health needs, physical disabilities and sensory impairments. At the time of our inspection the service was providing a service for up to seventy people.

The registered provider is required to have a registered manager in post and on the day of inspection there was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were protected from abuse and avoidable harm by staff who knew how to keep them safe and recognise signs of potential abuse. Relevant checks were carried out to ensure staff were recruited safely and were suitable to work with vulnerable adults.

We saw that assessments of people had been carried out and that plans of support had been developed from these to ensure staff had information about their needs. We saw that risk assessments for some people needed to be further developed to ensure that accurate information was available to help staff, keep them safe from harm.

Staff received a range of training that was relevant to their role to ensure they were able to carry out their work. We saw evidence that staff completed an in-depth induction programme to the service and received ongoing support via team meetings and professional supervisions from their line manager.

Staff knew how to administer medicines safely. Medication Administration Records (MARs) seen had been completed accurately.

We observed staff interacted positively with people who used the service and involved them in making decisions about their support, to ensure they were happy with the way this was delivered to them.

People told us that staff treated them with kindness, dignity and respect at all times.

We saw that people were asked for their views about the service. Satisfaction surveys were sent out periodically. When information was received that could improve the service action was taken..

A complaints policy was in place that was provided to people at the start of their use of the service. We saw evidence that when complaints were received they were followed up, investigated and where possible resolved.

The registered manager understood their responsibilities and reported accidents, incidents and other notifiable incidents as required.

All but two of the people we spoke with or completed surveys about the service were very complimentary about the service and told us they very happy with support they received. The negative comments received concerned new staff not always clearly following instructions included within care plans, whilst the other related to a complaint that had not yet been resolved.