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St Bridget's Residential Home Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 7 November 2018

During a routine inspection

This was an unannounced comprehensive inspection that took place on 7 and 9 November 2018. August 2018.

St Bridget’s Residential Home is registered to provide accommodation and personal care for up to 10 people. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

At our previous inspection carried out in January 2018 we made three requirements for breaches of regulations. These were in relation to a failure to display the home’s CQC rating on their website, shortfalls and inconsistencies in the recruitment of staff and non-compliance with The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA). Following the inspection, the registered manager submitted an action plan on how improvements would be made. At this inspection we found the requirements had been complied with.

The registered manager had worked at the service for many years. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were protected from neglect and abuse. The registered manager had assessed risks both in respect of the environment and also the delivery of care to ensure that people were supported safely with the least possible restriction on their freedom. Staff had been trained in safeguarding of adults so that they were aware of safeguarding referral procedures and how to identify potential abuse.

Accidents, incidents or near misses were recorded and monitored for developing trends. Pre-employment check procedures had been reviewed so ensure that regulations would be met in terms of staff recruitment. No new staff had been recruited since the last inspection. There were sufficient appropriately trained staff on duty to support people in a person-centred way.

Medicines were managed safely ensuring that people had medicines as prescribed by their doctor.

The service had made improvements so that they were now compliant with The Mental Capacity Act 2005. People’s physical, mental health and social needs were comprehensively assessed, and care and support was planned and delivered in a personalised way to meet those needs. Staff were appropriately trained and received support and supervision from the registered manager.

The premises were clean and well maintained. Individual bedrooms were furnished according to people’s preferences.People were provided with a good standard of food and their dietary needs had been assessed.

People, and where appropriate their families, were involved in decisions about their care and support. People were treated with kindness, respect and compassion, and their privacy and dignity was upheld. Relatives and friends could visit when they wished without notice.

Care plans had been developed for each person providing guidance to staff on how to meet their personalised needs. People had access to activities and encouraged to follow interests and hobbies. There was a well-publicised complaints procedure in place and a log of any complaints to evidence how complaints had been managed.

People were supported with their health care needs.

The home had a registered manager who had worked at the home for a long period, providing good leadership. A system of audits and surveying of views of the service was in place that sought to drive improvements and customer satisfaction. The provider had updated their website to display the CQC rating, meeting a requirement from the last inspection.

Inspection carried out on 3 January 2018

During a routine inspection

St Bridget’s Residential Home is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

This unannounced comprehensive inspection took place on 3,4 and 5 January 2018.

St Bridget’s Residential Home is in Bournemouth and can accommodate up to ten older people. At the time of the inspection eight people were living at the home.

The home had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.’

At this inspection we found three breaches of the regulations.

The provider had an established system for ensuring people were recruited to work in the service safely. However, the system had not always been followed. Staff recruitment records did not always include a full employment history and some recruitment checks and employment references were inconsistent. This was a breach of the regulations.

People’s rights were not always protected because staff had not acted in accordance with the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) in regard to and following conditions placed on their Deprivation of Liberty Safeguard. This was a breach of the regulations.

The provider had not displayed their current Care Quality Commission rating on their website. This was a breach of the regulations.

People felt they were safe and there were systems in place to safeguard people. Staff had completed training in safeguarding people and spoke knowledgeable about how to raise concerns if they suspected people were being abused.

People told us they enjoyed living at St Bridget’s Residential Home and said the staff treated them with kindness and warmth. Relatives were very happy with the care and service provided by the home. Staff knew people well and cared for them in the way they preferred.

Risks to people and the service were managed and planned for. People’s medicines were stored safely and administered as prescribed.

There were enough appropriately trained staff available on each shift to ensure people were cared for safely. Staff received appropriate training which was refreshed at regular intervals. Staff told us they felt well supported by the management team.

People’s needs were assessed and planned for. People had good access to healthcare and staff referred people appropriately to health care professionals. Health professionals supplied positive written feedback on the service people received at St Bridget’s Residential Home.

People told us they knew how to make a complaint and said staff listened to them and took action if they needed to raise concerns or queries. Records showed complaints were investigated in accordance with the provider’s complaint policy.

People were provided with a choice of healthy home cooked food and drink that ensured their nutritional needs were met.

People, relatives and staff told us they felt the service was well led, with a clear management structure in place. There were governance systems in place to assess and improve the quality and safety of the service. However, the systems in place were not fully effective as they had not identified the shortfalls and breaches of regulation found at this inspection.

Inspection carried out on 1 & 2 September 2015

During a routine inspection

This was an unannounced comprehensive inspection carried out by one Care Quality Commission Inspector on 1 and 2 September 2015. Our previous inspection of the home completed in July 2014 found the provider was compliant with the regulations.

St Bridget’s Residential Home provides accommodation, care and support for up to ten older people. At the time of the inspection ten people were living at the home. The home had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.’

People told us they felt safe living in the home. The provider had suitable processes in place to safeguard people from different forms of abuse. Staff had completed training in safeguarding people and told us they knew the correct process for raising concerns if they should observe any form of abuse.

The provider had a range of systems in place to protect people from risks to their safety. These included premises and maintenance checks, regular servicing and checks for equipment such as hoists, lifts and all electrical equipment and risk assessments for each person living in the home.

Medicines were managed safely and stored securely. People received their medicine when they needed it and appropriate arrangements were in place for the storage and disposal of medicines.

There were enough appropriately trained staff available on each shift to ensure people were cared for safely. Staff spent time talking and interacting with all the people in the home and told us they had enough time to do their job effectively. We observed staff delivered support and assistance in a friendly manner and spent quality time with people, ensuring they were comfortable, content and had activities to do and drinks and snacks available.

The provider had a good system in place to ensure staff received their required training courses. The provider employed their own staff trainer which ensured staff received consistent, practical training when they required it.

Staff told us they were well supported by the management team who they found very approachable and stated were always ready to listen or help if required. They spoke of the supportive, homely atmosphere in the service and how the staff worked well as a team together. They told us communication within the home was good and they felt fully involved and respected working in the home.

The manager was aware of their responsibilities in regard to the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). These safeguards aim to protect people living in care homes and hospitals from being inappropriately deprived of their liberty. People were supported to make decisions and where people did not have the capacity; decisions were made in their best interest.

The provider had implemented a system to ensure accidents and incidents were recorded and analysed. This meant any trends and patterns could be identified and preventative measures put in place where required.

People were provided with a choice of healthy home cooked food and drink that ensured their nutritional needs were met.

There was a system in place for people to raise concerns and complaints. Records showed the manager responded to complaints in accordance with the provider’s policy.

There were clear systems in place to monitor and improve the quality of the service provided.

Inspection carried out on 28 July 2014

During a routine inspection

We carried out this inspection under Section 60 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 as part of our regulatory functions. This inspection was planned to check whether the provider is meeting the legal requirements and regulations associated with the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and to pilot a new inspection process being introduced by CQC which looks at the overall quality of the service.

This was an unannounced inspection.

St Bridget's Residential Home provides accommodation and care for up to ten older people. Ten people were living at the home at the time of the inspection. A registered manager was in post at the time of inspection. A Registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service and has the legal responsibility for meeting the requirements of the law; as does the provider.

The provider had made appropriate arrangements to identify and respond to abuse. Staff were aware of the provider’s safeguarding policy and how to respond to actual or suspected abuse to keep people safe.

The registered manager was aware of and meeting their responsibilities under the Mental Capacity Act 2005 Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

People’s needs were met in a timely manner. There were sufficient staff to enable them to perform their roles safely and effectively. The registered manager monitored staffing levels to ensure that they remained sufficient.

People’s needs were assessed and care was planned and delivered to meet them. Risks to people had been assessed, for example of falls and skin damage. Staff were aware of the risks each person faced and how these risks should be managed.

There were a number of distractions during the lunchtime meal which may have had a detrimental effect on the pleasure of the mealtime. However, no one complained or looked uncomfortable.

People were able to see healthcare professionals whenever needed. We looked at people’s care records and found evidence that people had accessed healthcare professionals such as the GP and chiropodist.

People were treated with consideration and respect and their privacy was respected. One person told us, “The carers are very good and treat us very well.”

The provider had a complaints procedure and people felt able to complain. Staff felt able to raise concerns and were encouraged to do so. The provider had a whistle-blowing policy which provided information for staff as to how they could raise concerns.

The registered manager told us they kept updated as to changes in practice. For example, they told us they subscribed to e-mail bulletins from a variety of organisations including, the Health and Safety Executive and the Care Quality Commission.

Inspection carried out on 15 May 2013

During a routine inspection

There were 10 people living at St Bridget�s Residential Home at the time of our inspection. We spoke with eight people in order to hear about their experiences of the service they received.

Everyone we spoke with was complimentary about the home�s staff. They told us that the staff ensured their privacy and dignity was promoted. They described the the staff as �very helpful�, �kind�, and �fantastic�.

People said they were involved in making decisions about the care and treatment they received. They told us there were no rules and regulation that constrained their day to day lives.

People said the food the home provided was good, varied and plentiful. They told us they thought there were always enough staff on duty and they were all trained and competent to meet their needs.

There were measures in place to prevent and control infections.

There were arrangements in place that ensured people's prescribed medication was managed safely and securely.

The provider ensured that equipment required to promote the welfare of people living in the home was serviced in accordance with relevant regulations and safe to use.

We saw that checks were carried out that ensured the provider�s procedures were followed. There were also systems in place to identify where the quality of the service could be improved.

Inspection carried out on 12 March 2013

During a routine inspection

We saw that the staff who were on duty at the time of the visit were polite and kind in their manner towards people. People we spoke to were happy with the care and support that they had received at the home. We spoke to two relatives who said that they felt that the home met their relatives needs and that staff were excellent and approachable.

People's needs and wishes had been assessed and plans had been put in place to meet them. We found that people who were at risk of falls had been identified and their moving and handling care plans had included the measures to be taken to minimise the risk.

Records showed that staff had received the training and support they required to be able to provide the care and support people required. We saw that records showed that staff had received regular supervision and annual appraisals. Staff we spoke to confirmed this.

We observed that prescribed medication stored in people's rooms could be easily accessed as the keys were 'hidden' on top of the lockable metal cabinets. We also found that when a person did not accept medication as prescribed staff had not fully discussed the implications with them, or informed the doctor.

We found that the home had conducted an annual satisfaction survey in July 2012. The manager had analysed the results and had addressed the points which had been raised.

Inspection carried out on 14 February 2012

During an inspection in response to concerns

The aim of the inspection was to look into concerns raised through an adult safeguarding referral and to follow-up on two compliance actions and one improvement action made at the last inspection of the home in November 2011.

We were assisted by the home�s registered manager throughout the inspection. We spoke with two people living at the home and with one member of staff. We also carried out a tour of the premises.

One person we spoke with was not able to tell us about what it was like to live at the home owing to their mental frailty. The other person we spoke with told us that it was a good home and a nice place to live. They said all their needs were met and that the staff were very helpful and kind. They told us, �If anyone finds anything to complain about here, they are a difficult person to please�.

Inspection carried out on 21 September 2011

During a routine inspection

At the time of our inspection visit to St Bridget�s Residential Home (St Bridget�s) on 21 September 2011 there were 10 people living there. We spoke with five people about their experiences of living in the home. We also spoke with two members of staff about the training they had received and the help that they provided to people living in the home . We spoke with one visiting health care professional who was visiting the home at the time of our inspection visit and another by telephone in order to obtain their views about the service.

People living in the home told us that the staff were kind and courteous and provided all the help they needed. They said that staff ensured that their privacy and dignity were upheld and that their preferred lifestyles were respected. They told us that social activities were regularly organised in which they could participate and that there were no restrictions imposed on their visitors. They said that their medication was looked after for them and that visits by doctors, opticians and chiropodists were arranged for them if necessary. They told us that they felt safe and that the building was kept secure. They said that they thought the staff working in the home were well trained and that they knew about the help people needed because they had worked in the home a long time. They told us that they were asked to complete questionnaires in order to obtain their opinions about the service they received.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)