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Silverdale Residential Home Good

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 27 November 2018

Silverdale Residential Home is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. This service does not provide nursing care. Silverdale Residential Home provides care for up to eight adults with a learning disability and/or mental health conditions and/or dementia.

The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.

On the day of our comprehensive unannounced inspection visit on 23 October 2018, there were seven people using the service.

At our previous inspection of 11 October 2017, this service was rated requires improvement overall, and in each of the key questions. There were breaches of four Regulations of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. These were Regulation 12: Safe care and treatment, Regulation 17: Good governance, Regulation 11: Need for consent and Regulation 18: Staffing. Improvements were needed in how the service assessed and monitored the service provided, maintaining people’s care records, policies and procedures were out of date, and staff training. At this inspection of 5 November 2018, we found improvements had been made and the service was no longer in breach of Regulation.

There was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons.’ Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. Recent events require registration changes, this is being addressed by the service.

People received a safe service. There were systems in place designed to reduce the risks of abuse and avoidable harm. Where incidents happened, the service learned from these to drive improvement. Risks to people were identified and guidance for staff in place to mitigate these. People were supported with their medicines in a safe way. Staff were available to support people and the systems to recruit staff safely were robust. Infection control systems were in place.

People received an effective service. People were supported by staff who were trained and supported to meet their needs. People had access to health professionals when needed. Staff worked with other professionals involved in people’s care. People’s nutritional needs were assessed and met. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. The environment was well maintained and suitable for the people using the service.

People received a caring service. People shared positive relationships with staff. People’s privacy, independence and dignity was respected. People were listened to in relation to their choices, and they and their relatives, where appropriate, were involved in their care planning.

People received a responsive service. There were systems in place to assess, plan and meet people’s individual needs and preferences. People’s had access to social activities to reduce the risks of isolation and boredom. There was a complaints procedure in place.

People received a service which was well-led. The service provided was assessed and monitored to provide people with a good quality service. Where shortfalls were identified actions were taken to improve. People's views about the service and these were valued and listened to. As a result, the service continued to improve.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 27 November 2018

The service was safe.

Risks to people were assessed and mitigated. This included risks in the environment and in their daily living and risks associated with abuse.

There were systems in place to manage people�s medicines safely.

Staff were available when people needed assistance. Recruitment of staff was done safely.

The service had infection control policies and procedures which were designed to reduce risks to people.

Effective

Good

Updated 27 November 2018

The service was effective.

People were supported by staff who were trained and supported to meet their needs.

People�s nutritional needs were assessed and met. People were supported to access services which ensured they received ongoing healthcare support.

People�s capacity to make their own decisions was assessed.

The environment was suitable for the people who used the service.

Caring

Good

Updated 27 November 2018

The service was caring.

People�s privacy and dignity was respected.

Staff treated with people with kindness and they knew people well. Staff and people shared positive relationships.

People�s choices were respected and listened to.

Responsive

Good

Updated 27 November 2018

The service was responsive.

People�s needs were assessed, planned for and met. People�s end of life decisions were documented.

There were systems in place to support people to participate in social activities.

There was a system in place to manage people�s complaints.

Well-led

Good

Updated 27 November 2018

The service was well-led.

The service had quality assurance systems to identify shortfalls, address them and learn from them.

The service provided an open culture. People�s views about the service were listened to and acted on to drive improvement.