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Ashton Manor Nursing Home Good

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 11 October 2018

The inspection took place on 4 September 2018 and was unannounced. Our last inspection was in July 2017 where we identified one breach of the legal requirements in relation to medicines and infection control. At this inspection, the provider had taken action to meet the legal requirements of the regulations.

Ashton Manor Nursing Home is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

Ashton Manor Nursing Home provides care to up to 39 people in one adapted building. They provide support to older people, people with physical disabilities and long term medical conditions. They also provided support to people living with dementia. At the time of our visit, there were 32 people living at the home.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Risks to people were assessed and actions were identified and implemented to keep people safe. Staff understood people’s clinical needs and appropriate support was provided to meet them. People had regular access to healthcare professionals and staff worked collaboratively with them. People’s medicines were managed and administered in line with best practice and staff had received medicines training and their competency had been assessed. Nursing staff had support to maintain their competencies and the provider had checked that nurses were registered with the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC).

There were sufficient numbers of staff to meet people’s needs safely and the provider had carried out checks on staff to ensure they were suitable for their roles. Staff underwent training before working with people and this had been regularly refreshed. Staff had regular one to one supervision meetings and there was an appraisal and competency framework in place to allow staff to develop themselves. Staff felt supported by management and there were systems in place to enable communication between staff.

Staff understood their roles in safeguarding people from abuse and records showed staff responded appropriately to incidents. The provider monitored incidents and clinical risks such as weight loss and infections. There were a variety of checks and audits undertaken at the service to identify and respond to any issues. People were regularly asked for their feedback and regular meetings took place to involve people in the running of the home. There was a complaints policy in place and records showed complaints were responded to in line with this policy.

People’s care was planned in a person centred way and staff knew what was important to people. We observed that staff were kind and caring and got on well with people. Staff offered people choices and involved them in their care. People were encouraged to maintain skills and independence and staff provided support in a way that was respectful of people’s privacy and dignity. End of life care was planned sensitively and delivered in a personalised way, by trained staff.

Staff supported people to eat food that matched their preferences and met their dietary needs. There was a wide variety of activities taking place at the home which covered a range of interests. People lived in a clean home environment that had been adapted for their needs. Relatives told us they were made to feel welcome and staff knew what was important to people.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 11 October 2018

The service was safe.

People lived in a clean home environment with measures in place to reduce the risk of the spread of infection.

Staff administered people's medicines safely and they were stored and managed in line with best practice.

There were sufficient numbers of staff to keep people safe and appropriate checks were undertaken to ensure staff were suitable for their roles.

Risks to people were assessed and plans were implemented to keep people safe. Staff responded appropriately to accidents or incidents.

Staff understood their roles in safeguarding people from abuse.

Effective

Good

Updated 11 October 2018

The service was effective.

People's clinical needs were met and staff supported people to access healthcare professionals.

Staff had appropriate training and support for their roles. Nursing staff benefitted from clinical support and supervision.

People were prepared food in line with their preferences and dietary needs.

Staff gathered important information about people's needs before they came to live at the home.

The home environment was adapted for people's needs.

People had consented to their care and where they were not able to, the Mental Capacity Act 2005 had been followed.

Caring

Good

Updated 11 October 2018

The service was caring.

People were supported by kind and caring staff that knew them well.

Staff involved people in their care and enabled them to make choices.

People were encouraged to maintain independence.

Staff provided care in a way that was respectful of people's privacy and promoted their dignity.

Responsive

Good

Updated 11 October 2018

The service was responsive.

People's care was planned in a person-centred way.

Staff regularly reviewed people's needs and responded to any changes.

End of life care was planned in a sensitive and personalised way.

People were informed of how to raise a complaint and complaints had been handled in line with policy.

Well-led

Good

Updated 11 October 2018

The service was well-led.

Management carried out a variety of audits and checks to monitor and improve the quality of care people received.

Staff felt supported by management and were encouraged to make suggestions and communicate effectively.

People were involved in the running of the home and their feedback was regularly sought.

The provider had good links with stakeholders and the local community.

Where required, the provider had notified CQC of events that they were required to by law.