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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 13 February 2018

We inspected Inglewood Nursing Home on 18 and 20 December 2017 and our visit was unannounced. At the previous inspection Inglewood Nursing Home was rated ‘good’. Inglewood Nursing Home is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. Inglewood Nursing Home provides nursing and personal care and accommodates up to 60 people in one adapted building. At the time of the inspection there were 53 people living at the home. People were living with a range of complex health care needs which included people who have stroke and diabetes. Some people had a degree of memory loss associated with their age and physical health conditions. Some people were also receiving care and support for end of life care needs. Most people required help and support from two members of staff in relation to their mobility and personal care needs. Accommodation was provided over two floors with a passenger lift that provided level access to all parts of the home.

There was a registered manager at the home. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.’

Improvements were needed to ensure the service was consistently meeting the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. Quality assurance systems were in place but these had not identified some areas that needed to be improved in relation to people’s records, and documentation in relation to people’s mental capacity. We made a recommendation about this. Other areas for improvement had been identified and work was taking place to address these.

Staff knew people really well. They had a good understanding of each person’s needs and choices. They could tell us about people’s personal histories including their spiritual and cultural wishes. Each person was treated as an individual and their choices and rights were respected and upheld. People were supported to make their own choices about what they did throughout the day.

People were supported by staff who were kind and caring. Staff knew people well and had good relationships with them. Staff maintained people's privacy and dignity. They understood the importance of confidentiality. Relatives were able to visit at any time, and were made to feel welcome.

There were enough staff, who had been safely recruited, working to ensure people’s needs and preferences could be met. Staff had received the training they needed to support people and deliver care in a way that responded to people's changing needs.

People were looked after safely. Staff had a good understanding of the risks associated with the people they looked after. Staff understood the procedures in place to safeguard people from the risk of abuse and discrimination.

People were supported to eat and drink a variety of food. They were provided with a choice of freshly cooked meals and drinks each day. People’s health was monitored and staff responded when health needs changed. People were supported to attend healthcare appointments and were referred to external healthcare professionals when needed.

There were systems in place to ensure medicines were ordered, stored administered and disposed of safely. There was a complaints policy and people told us they were able to discuss any concerns with the registered manager or staff.

There was an open and friendly culture at the home. The registered manager was well thought of by people, visitors and staff. She worked hard to include people and staff in decisions about the home, and was committed to improving and developing the service.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 13 February 2018

Inglewood Nursing Home was safe.

People were protected from the risks of harm, abuse or discrimination.

Systems were in place to ensure there were enough staff, who had been safely recruited, to meet people�s needs.

Risk assessments were in place and helped to keep people safe.

There were systems in place to ensure medicines were ordered, stored administered and disposed of safely.

Effective

Good

Updated 13 February 2018

Inglewood Nursing Home was not consistently effective.

Improvements were needed to ensure The service was meeting the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards.

Staff received the training and support they needed to enable them to meet people�s needs.

People were supported to eat and drink a choice of food that met their individual needs and preferences.

People�s health and well-being needs were met. People were supported to have access to healthcare services when they needed them.

Caring

Good

Updated 13 February 2018

Inglewood Nursing Home was caring.

Staff knew people well and treated them with kindness, understanding and patience.

People were supported to make their own decisions and choices throughout the day.

People�s privacy and dignity were respected.

Responsive

Good

Updated 13 February 2018

Inglewood Nursing Home was responsive.

People received care that was person centred and met their individual needs. Staff had a good understanding of providing person-centred care. They knew and understood people as individuals.

There was a range of activities taking place and people told us they had enough to do throughout the day.

There was a complaints policy in place and people and visitors told us they would raise any concerns with staff.

Well-led

Requires improvement

Updated 13 February 2018

Inglewood Nursing Home was not consistently well-led.

Quality assurance systems were in place, but these had not identified some areas that needed to be improved in relation to people�s records. Other areas for improvement had been identified and work was taking place to address these.

There was a positive culture at the service. People and visitors spoke highly of the staff team and their life at the home. The registered manager worked hard to improve and develop the home.