You are here

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 6 June 2018

The inspection took place on 9 May 2018 and was unannounced. At the previous inspection on 10 March 2017 we identified one breach of the Health and Social Care Act (HSCA) 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. This was because risk assessments and risk management plans had not always been updated to reflect people’s changing needs, particularly in relation to their risk of falls. At this inspection we found that risk assessments were now being updated regularly and included meaningful information about people’s changing needs.

Half-Acre House is based in Rochdale and provides personal care and accommodation in 25 single occupancy bedrooms over two floors. The home has a number of communal areas as well as large grounds. At the time of the inspection there were 24 people using the service.

Half Acre House is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

There was a manager in place who was in the process of registering with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People we spoke with told us they felt safe at the home. The service had up to date policies relating to safeguarding adults and children and whistle blowing. Staff had undertaken training and were confident to report any concerns.

The recruitment system was robust and there were sufficient staff to help ensure people’s needs were met. General and individual risk assessments were in place and were reviewed and updated regularly.

Medicines systems for ordering, storage, administration, recording and disposal were robust. Up to date health and safety and fire evacuation policies and procedures were in place. The home was clean and there were no malodours anywhere in the building.

There was evidence of a thorough induction for new staff and further training was on-going. Care files included a good range of health and personal information and food and fluid charts were implemented and completed appropriately where required.

Nutritional and hydration requirements were addressed appropriately. People told us they enjoyed the food and they were given a good choice of food and drink.

The service was working within the legal requirements of The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

We observed care throughout the day and saw that staff demonstrated a commitment to providing care with compassion and kindness. People’s privacy and dignity was respected by staff and we saw them offering care interventions in a discreet and sensitive manner.

Records were stored securely and appropriate information was given to prospective users of the service and their relatives. People were involved in care planning and reviews of care.

Care was person-centred and people’s preferences, likes and dislikes were respected. There was a range of activities, events and trips out on offer at the home and people were encouraged to participate in meaningful activities during the day. Residents’ and relatives’ meetings were held regularly.

Complaints were responded to appropriately and the service had received a number of verbal and written compliments. Some staff were undertaking end of life training to help ensure people nearing the end of their lives would be cared for according to their wishes.

Staff felt supported in their roles. Staff appraisals were undertaken annually and staff meetings took place on a regular basis.

The service worked in partnership with local professionals and agencies. The business manager a

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 6 June 2018

The service was safe.

People felt safe at the home. There were up to date policies relating to safeguarding adults and children and whistle blowing. Staff had undertaken training and were confident to report any concerns.

The recruitment system was robust and there were sufficient staff to help ensure people’s needs were met. General and individual risk assessments were in place and were reviewed and updated regularly.

Medicines systems were fit for purpose. Health and safety measures were in place. The home was clean and there were no malodours anywhere in the building.

Effective

Good

Updated 6 June 2018

The service was effective.

There was a thorough induction for new staff and further training was on-going. Care files included health and personal information and food and fluid charts were implemented and completed appropriately where required.

Nutritional and hydration requirements were addressed appropriately. People said they enjoyed the food and they were given a good choice of food and drink.

The service was working within the legal requirements of The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

Caring

Good

Updated 6 June 2018

The service was caring.

We observed care throughout the day and saw that staff demonstrated a commitment to providing care with compassion and kindness. People’s privacy and dignity was respected by staff and they offered care interventions in a discreet and sensitive manner.

Records were stored securely and appropriate information was given to prospective users of the service and their relatives. People were involved in care planning and reviews of care.

Responsive

Good

Updated 6 June 2018

The service was responsive.

Care was person-centred and people’s preferences, likes and dislikes were respected. Risk assessments were reviewed and updated regularly.

There was a range of activities, events and trips out on offer at the home. People were encouraged to participate in meaningful activities during the day. Residents’ and relatives’ meetings were held regularly.

Complaints were responded to appropriately and the service had received verbal and written compliments. Some staff were undertaking end of life training to help ensure people nearing the end of their lives would be cared for according to their wishes.

Well-led

Good

Updated 6 June 2018

The service was well-led.

Staff felt supported in their roles. Staff appraisals were undertaken annually and staff meetings took place on a regular basis.

The service worked in partnership with local professionals and agencies. The business manager and provider attended a number of local meetings where good practice and new guidance were shared.

A number of audits took place and results were analysed and used to inform continual improvement to the service. The manager had notified CQC of any accidents, serious incidents and safeguarding allegations as they are required to do.