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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 13 December 2018

We inspected Queen Mary's and Mulberry House Nursing Home on 22 and 23 October 2018. The first day of the inspection was unannounced.

Queen Mary's and Mulberry House Nursing Home is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. Queen Mary's and Mulberry House Nursing Home provides accommodation and nursing care for up to 72 older people and younger people, some of who had physical disabilities. At the time of the inspection there were 59 people living at the home. Queen Mary's and Mulberry House Nursing Home is run as one and the home is divided into two units. Queen Mary's provides nursing care for people living with healthcare needs such as stroke, heart disease diabetes and dementia. Mulberry House provides nursing care and support for people living with an acquired brain injury. This can be because of an accident or following a health-related condition, such as a stroke or Parkinson’s disease. There were also some people, with a learning disability, living at the home. Most of whom also had an additional nursing need.

There were some people at the home living with a learning disability. CQC have developed guidance for homes who look after people with a learning disability. This is called Registering the Right Support. We have written to the provider to ask how they will develop the service to ensure it embraces the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. This is so people with learning disabilities and autism using the service, can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.

There was a registered manager at the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We had previously carried out an inspection in April 2016 where we rated the service as good, although we asked the provider to make improvements in relation to the recording and management of wounds. At this inspection we found improvements had been made in relation to wound management and the evidence continued to support the rating of Good. We found improvements were needed to some aspects of record keeping. However, there was no evidence or information from our inspection, and ongoing monitoring, that demonstrated serious risks or concerns.

This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

Improvements were needed to ensure people’s records always reflected the care and support they needed and received. Staff knew people well and had a good understanding of them as individuals and the care and support they needed. People received care that was person-centred and met their individual needs and choices. Activities were developed to meet each person’s needs.

People were supported by staff who were kind and caring. They treated people with kindness, understanding and patience. People were supported to make decisions and choices about what they did each day and their dignity and privacy was respected.

People’s safety was maintained because staff had a good understanding of the risks associated with the people they looked after. Risk assessments were in place and provided guidance.

People’s medicines were ordered, stored administered and disposed of safely. They were protected from the risks of harm, abuse or discrimination because staff had a good understanding of safeguarding procedures and their own responsibilities. There were enough staff working to provide the support pe

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 13 December 2018

The service has improved to Good.

People’s safety was maintained because staff had a good understanding of the risks associated with the people they looked after. Risk assessments were in place and provided guidance.

People’s medicines were ordered, stored administered and disposed of safely.

People were protected from the risks of harm, abuse or discrimination because staff had a good understanding of safeguarding procedures and their own responsibilities.

There were enough staff working to provide the support people needed. Recruitment procedures ensured only suitable staff worked at the home.

Effective

Good

Updated 13 December 2018

The service remains Good.

Caring

Good

Updated 13 December 2018

The service remains Good.

Responsive

Good

Updated 13 December 2018

The service remains Good.

Well-led

Requires improvement

Updated 13 December 2018

The service has deteriorated to requires improvement because people’s records did not always reflect the care and support they needed.

The registered manager was well thought of and supportive to people and staff. They were continually striving to improve and develop the service.

Quality assurance systems helped to identify where improvements were needed across the service.