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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 2 October 2018

We carried out this unannounced inspection on 21 and 22 August 2018. Woodlands Quaker Care Home is a care home without nursing. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

The inspection was prompted in part by a notification of an incident which raised concern about staffs understanding of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and when this should be used. This inspection examined those risks.

Woodlands Quaker is a residential home that provides personal care and accommodation for up to 44 older people. The service accommodates up to 35 people in the 'Main House' and up to 9 people in a self-contained unit called 'The Spinney'. The Spinney accommodates people with higher levels of dependency, most of whom are living with dementia. At the time of the inspection there were 44 people living at the service.

A registered manager was in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Staff understood their responsibility to report any concerns and were aware of the action to take if they suspected abuse had occurred. People were supported to manage their risks by staff who were aware of the need to protect people from avoidable harm. There were sufficient numbers of staff available to meet people’s care and support needs. The provider recruited staff safely. People received their medicines as prescribed. The environment was well maintained and clean. Systems were in place to monitor infection control.

Staff had the knowledge and skills required to provide effective care. People’s care needs had been assessed and they were involved in the development of their care records. People were asked for their consent before care was provided and their decisions were respected. People’s capacity to make decisions had been assessed and staff understood the principles of the Mental Capacity Act. Staff ensured people had enough food and drink and received support from relevant healthcare professionals when required.

People received support from kind and caring staff. People were encouraged to make their own choices and decisions. People were supported to maintain their independence and staff supported people in a way that respected their privacy and dignity.

People were involved in the planning and review of their care and care records were reflective of their needs. Information about changes to people’s care needs was shared with staff to ensure people continued to receive the support required. People had access to a wide range of activities and hobbies which met their individual interests. People knew who to contact if they were unhappy about any aspect of their care. The provider had systems in place to manage complaints effectively.

People felt the service was well-led and said they were happy with the care they received. People and staff felt confident to share their ideas and the registered manager used these to make improvements. There were effective quality audit systems in place to monitor the quality of service people received.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 2 October 2018

The service was safe.

People were protected from harm because staff understood their responsibilities to keep people safe. Risks to people were assessed, monitored and managed. People told us there were sufficient numbers of staff to meet their needs. People received their medicines as prescribed. Infection control processes were followed to prevent the spread of infection.

Effective

Good

Updated 2 October 2018

The service was effective.

People were supported by staff who had the knowledge to meet their needs. People were asked for their consent before receiving care or support. People were supported to maintain a balanced diet and to access healthcare professionals when required.

Caring

Good

Updated 2 October 2018

The service was caring.

People were supported by staff who were kind and who knew their individual preferences. People were supported to maintain their independence and were treated with dignity and respect.

Responsive

Good

Updated 2 October 2018

The service was responsive.

People’s preferences were understood by staff and care records were reflective of people’s needs. People were encouraged to follow their individual interests and hobbies. People knew how to complain if they were unhappy with the service they received. The provider had an effective complaints process in place to manage and investigate concerns.

Well-led

Good

Updated 2 October 2018

The service was well-led.

People and staff told us the service was well-led and the registered manager was approachable. Staff felt supported in their roles. There were effective systems in place to monitor the quality of service people received and this was used to make improvements when required.