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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 31 January 2018

This unannounced inspection was undertaken on 29 November 2017 and was carried out by one inspector. At our last comprehensive inspection in October 2016 the service was rated ‘Requires Improvement’. We undertook a focussed inspection of this service in April 2017 however the rating remained ‘Requires Improvement’. At this inspection the service was rated as ‘Good’.

Yad Voezer 1 is a ‘care home’ for men who have a learning disability. People in care homes receive accommodation and personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. The home accommodates a maximum of 10 men. At the time of our inspection there were eight men living at the home. The home provides support in line with orthodox Jewish custom and practice.

The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Staff understood their responsibilities to keep people safe from potential abuse, bullying or discrimination.

Risks had been recorded in people’s care plans and ways to reduce these risks had been explored and were being followed appropriately.

People using the service were relaxed with staff and the way staff interacted with people had a positive effect on their well-being.

There were systems in place to ensure medicines were handled and stored securely and administered to people safely and appropriately.

Staff were positive about working at the home and told us they appreciated the support and encouragement they received from the registered manager.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

Staff understood the principles of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA 2005) and knew that they must offer as much choice to people as possible in making day to day decisions about their care.

People were included in making choices about what they wanted to eat and staff understood and followed people’s nutritional plans in respect of any healthcare needs people had. All food at the home was provided under Jewish laws, customs and practice.

People had regular access to healthcare professionals such as doctors, dentists, chiropodists and opticians.

Staff treated people as unique individuals who had different likes, dislikes, needs and preferences.

Everyone had an individual plan of care which was reviewed on a regular basis.

Relatives told us that the management and staff listened to them and acted on their suggestions and wishes.

People were supported to raise any concerns or complaints and relatives were happy to raise any issues with the registered manager if they needed to.

People, their relatives, staff and health and social care professionals were all included in monitoring the quality of the service. The registered manager and staff understood that observation was very important to identify people’s well-being where people did not always communicate verbally.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 31 January 2018

The service was safe. Staff understood their responsibilities to protect people from potential abuse and knew how to raise any concerns with the appropriate safeguarding authorities.

Where any risks to people�s safety had been identified, the management had thought about and recorded ways to mitigate these risks.

There were systems in place to ensure medicines were administered to people safely and appropriately.

There were enough staff working at the home to support people safely.

The home was clean and staff understood their responsibilities in relation to hygiene and infection control.

Effective

Good

Updated 31 January 2018

The service was effective. Staff had the knowledge and skills necessary to support people properly and safely.

Staff understood the principles of the MCA and knew that they must offer as much choice to people as possible in making day to day decisions about their care.

People told us they enjoyed the food which was provided in line with Jewish law, custom and practice and staff knew about any special diets people required.

The design, decoration and adaptation of the home was designed to meet people�s needs.

People had good access to healthcare professionals such as doctors, dentists, chiropodists and opticians.

Caring

Good

Updated 31 January 2018

The service was caring. Staff treated people with compassion and kindness

.

People were able to express their views and make choices about their care on a daily basis.

Staff understood that people�s diversity was important and something that needed to be upheld and valued.

Staff demonstrated a good understanding of peoples� likes and dislikes and their life history.

Responsive

Good

Updated 31 January 2018

The service was responsive. Care plans included details about the nature of support required to meet people's changing needs and preferences.

People were supported with a range of activities both in the home and the local community.

Staff maintained records of care and had a handover system that ensured information was shared across the staff team appropriately.

People told us they knew how to raise any concerns or make a complaint and we saw that complaints were taken seriously and investigated appropriately.

Well-led

Good

Updated 31 January 2018

The service was well-led. The management and staff shared a clear vision and a set of values regarding the service they provided. These values were put into practice in the day to day running of the home.

There were systems in place to identify and manage risks to the quality and safety of the service. These systems were used to drive improvement within the service.

The management and staff maintained links to relevant local community resources that reflected the needs and preferences of the people living at the home.