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Oakview Residential Care Home Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 10 August 2018

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 10 and 16 August 2018 and the first day was unannounced. The inspection team consisted of one adult social care inspector.

At our last inspection in October 2016 we found two breaches of regulations relating to the safe management of medicines and a lack of robust audit procedures. At this inspection we found improvements had been made and the service was now meeting these requirements.

Oakview is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

Oakview is a residential care home in the Gatley area of Stockport and can accommodate 12 people. The home has a communal lounge overlooking the enclosed rear garden and a dining room. There are four bedrooms on the ground floor and six bedrooms on the first floor. Two of the bedrooms can accommodate two people.

People told us they felt safe living in the home and staff demonstrated they understood how to keep people safe and how they should report any concerns about people living in the home.

Risks to people were assessed and their care records explained how people needed to be supported in order for them to do the things they wanted, in the way they wanted, in the safest way possible.

Staff had time to spend with people living in the home and supported them in an unhurried way. Rotas confirmed the staffing levels we observed were normal for the home.

Medicines were stored safely and people were supported appropriately to ensure they received them as they had been prescribed. Documentation was audited regularly to ensure people were receiving their medicines safely.

People’s needs were assessed and detailed care plans were in place explaining about people’s needs and choices. This enabled staff to support people in the way the person preferred.

Staff told us they felt very supported by the management in the home and had regular training and supervisions. Records we looked at confirmed that regular training and supervisions took place.

Meals were cooked freshly in the home’s kitchen and people told us they enjoyed the food. A variety of food was available for people to suit their cultural preferences.

Visiting healthcare professionals spoke highly of the home and told us staff in the home worked closely with them to ensure people living there were cared for well. Professionals visiting the home were encouraged to make suggestions to improve the care people received.

People living in the home were involved in choosing the décor and had recently chosen new wallpaper, carpets and curtains for the lounge. People were encouraged to personalise their bedrooms.

Consent was always sought from people before they were supported and where people lacked the capacity to give consent, procedures were in place to ensure they were supported in line with their best interests. People were encouraged to make choices about their care and we saw their choices were respected by staff.

People living in the home knew the staff well and told us they supported them in a very caring and compassionate way. Staff were very good at treating people as individuals and we observed staff supporting people in different ways according to the person’s preferences.

A range of activities were available for people to take part in within the home, in the local community and in other homes owned by the provider.

People told us they hadn’t needed to complain but if they did have any concerns they could speak to any member of staff and were confident their concerns would be listened to and addressed.

The home had a registered manager in post. The registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health

Inspection carried out on 31 October 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 31 October 2016 and was unannounced.

Oakview is a residential care home and can accommodate 12 older people who may have dementia care or mental health needs. Located in the Gatley area of Stockport, the home has a communal lounge overlooking the enclosed rear garden and a dining room. There are four bedrooms on the ground floor and six bedrooms on the first floor, two of which have ensuite shower room facilities. There is no passenger lift between floors, although there is a stair lift. There is limited off road parking.

The service had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At this inspection we identified two breaches of the regulations of The Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) 2014. One breach was in relation to; the safe management of medicines and the second breach was in relation to lack of robust quality audit processes being in place. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of this report. We made three recommendations, one in relation to fitting a privacy lock and privacy blind in one bathroom area to maintain the privacy and dignity of people using this facility, one to update the Statement of Purpose with the correct Regulation details and one to ensure all new staff that have not previously worked in a social care setting are enrolled to complete the Care Certificate induction training.

Friends and relatives of people who used the service spoke highly of the quality of service and the caring nature of the staff.

The staff personnel files we looked at showed us that safe and appropriate recruitment and selection practices were taking place and that staff were receiving training that was appropriate to support the job role they were employed to carry out.

People felt safe and had no concerns about their safety or wellbeing. Staff told us, and records seen confirmed that they had received training in safeguarding vulnerable adults and were knowledgeable about recognising the signs of abuse and how to report and deal with them.

Care plans and associated documentation were person centred and provided staff the details needed in order to provide effective support in accordance with the person’s needs and preferences.

Staff were observed to be kind and considerate with people and also responded to requests for assistance quickly and in a sensitive manner. We also saw staff treat people and their visitors with respect and dignity and provide privacy when needed.

Staff, people using the service and their relatives and friends were provided with opportunities to give feedback of the service being delivered and potential improvements that could be made.

Inspection carried out on 2 January 2014

During a routine inspection

This inspection was carried out to check if improvements had been made following the previous inspection in August 2013 in which two compliance actions were issued. We asked the provider to send us action plans outlining how they intended to become compliant with the relevant regulations. We wanted to check that both action plans had been implemented.

There were seven people living at Oakview Residential Care Home at the time of this inspection. We spoke with four people who used the service and staff who were working there. We looked around the building and checked records of care. We found that Oakview Residential Care Home was now compliant with the relevant regulations.

People spoken with told us they were happy with the care and support they received at the home. They told us they were happy with their care.

We spoke with a Community Psychiatric Nurse (CPN) who told us that the staff were managing people�s specific needs very well.

We saw people resting in the communal area of the home and in their own room. We saw staff asking people about the way they wanted their care to be delivered. We observed staff treating people in a kind and respectful manner.

We looked at the care records of three people and found these had been updated and reviewed to reflect their identified needs, conditions and circumstances.

We found that improvements had been made to address the shortfalls associated with records in the home.

Inspection carried out on 5 August 2013

During an inspection looking at part of the service

This inspection was carried out to check if improvements had been made following the previous inspection in March 2013 in which four warning notices were served. The inspection team consisted of 1 compliance manager and 2 compliance inspectors.

We we found that improvements had been made in some areas such as infection control, safeguarding vulnerable adults and quality assurance. However records management still required improvement.

We spoke with four people who lived at the home. Two people spoken with told us they were happy with the care and support they received at the home. They told us: �They�re very nice to us here� and �They look after me and see that I get what I need." We observed staff treating people in a kind and respectful manner.

We looked at the care records of five people who used the service. We noted shortfalls in records presented a risk that people might not receive safe effective care, treatment and support that met their needs and protected their rights.

During the inspection we saw people were not involved in meaningful activities and were seen to be sitting in the home�s communal lounge and in their own room. One person told us they would like more to do during the day and said: �There�s nothing much to do here. Sometimes I read, but nothing else.�

We looked at the records in the home and found that they were not to an acceptable standard. They were lacking in the detail recorded and one care plan was absent from the care records.

Inspection carried out on 20 March 2013

During an inspection looking at part of the service

During this inspection visit we reviewed five standards that were subject to a compliance action at the last inspection, and one standard that is a routine outcome that we always look at. The inspection visit was carried out to check if improvements had been made following the previous inspection in September 2012. During this inspection we found improvements had failed to be introduced because the provider did not have effective systems in place to identify, assess, and manage risks to health, safety, and welfare.

We spoke with three people who used the service and three staff members as well as the provider during the course of our inspection. We also contacted three relatives of people who lived at the home to gain their views, all of which were positive in respect of the care provided.

Limited information was obtained from some people using the service due to communication difficulties. In light of this, we used the Short Observational Framework for Inspection (SOFI). SOFI is a specific way of observing care to help us understand the experience of people who could not talk with us.

We saw that people responded positively to staff interactions and observed staff to be friendly and supportive to the people who lived there. The people we spoke with told us they had no concerns about the staff and were happy living at the home.

Inspection carried out on 20 September 2012

During a routine inspection

We completed an unannounced inspection visit 20 September 2012, to Oakview Residential Care Home. We spoke with three people who used the service and three staff members as well as the provider during the course of our inspection. We also contacted four relatives of people who lived at the home to gain their views, all of which were positive in respect of the care provided.

Limited information was obtained from some people using the service due to communication difficulties. In light of this, we used the Short Observational Framework for Inspection (SOFI). SOFI is a specific way of observing care to help us understand the experience of people who could not talk with us. During the visit we saw that people responded positively to staff interactions and observed staff to be friendly and supportive to the people who lived at Oakview Residential Care Home.

The people we spoke with told us they had no concerns about the staff respecting their privacy or dignity.

We spoke to three people who used the service who told us they were "happy" with the care they received. They told us the staff were "friendly" and "kind."

We spoke to four relatives about their views on whether their family member was treated with respect and their dignity and privacy maintained. One relative said: "I would have no hesitation in saying the staff are always respectful."

We saw that staff engaged with people in a very person centred way while we were observing care. One person who lived at the home told us: "I really like it here, it's homely." Another person said: "It's my home, I know where everything is."

We found that there were areas where the service could improve. These included demonstrating involvement of people or their representatives in their care plans and risk assessment documentation; staff training updates, quality monitoring and maintaining regular health and safety checks.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)