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Inspection carried out on 29 November 2019

During a routine inspection

Meadow Acres is registered with the Care Quality Commission as a care home without nursing. It provides care, support and accommodation for up to eight people who live with a learning disability. At the time of this inspection there were eight people using the service.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People felt safe living in the home and their relatives told us that the service gave them “Peace of mind” for their relatives. There were processes in place to ensure that staff knew about how to protect people from abuse and where to escalate concerns if they needed to. There were systems in place to assess risks to people’s health and wellbeing which staff were aware of for each person.

Staff received training and development in order to be able to support people safely. Staff said that they had also been encouraged to undertake qualifications to develop them further in their roles. Some staff had received training specific to some of the conditions relevant to people who lived in the home.

There was a calm atmosphere in the home and staff responded to people in a kind and caring manner. Staff knew people well and were able to communicate with people individually based on their abilities. People had their privacy and dignity protected.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

The service applied the principles and values of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These ensure that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes that include control, choice and independence.

The outcomes for people using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. People's support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent.

People told us that they like the Registered Manager and found them approachable. People and their relatives said that they had their feedback listened to and felt involved in the service. There were systems in place which supported monitoring the quality of the service provided in order to drive improvement.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

The last rating for this service was good (report published 10 June 2017)

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 22 May 2017

During a routine inspection

Meadow Acres is registered with the Care Quality Commission as a care home without nursing. It provides care, support and accommodation for up to eight people who live with a learning disability. At the time of this inspection there were eight people using the service.

At the last inspection the service was rated Good. At this inspection we found the service remained Good.

People told us they felt safe living in the service. Risks to people’s lives and well-being were appropriately planned for and managed. People who used the service told us there were enough competent staff to provide them with support when they needed it. Concerns in relation to medicine storage in warm weather had been acknowledged by the registered manager and systems were being implemented to address this.

Staff had received appropriate training, support and development to help them carry out their role effectively. The service was meeting the requirements of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. People received appropriate support to maintain healthy nutrition and hydration.

People told us and we observed that they were treated with kindness by staff who respected their privacy and upheld their dignity.

People were given the opportunity to feed back on the service and their views were acted on. People received personalised care that met their individual needs. People were given appropriate support and encouragement to access meaningful activities and follow their individual interests.

People told us they knew how to complain and were confident they would be listened to if they wished to make a complaint.

The registered manager had created an open, transparent and inclusive atmosphere within the service. People, staff and external health professionals were invited to take part in discussions around shaping the future of the service. There was a robust quality assurance system in place and shortfalls identified were promptly acted on to improve the service.

Further information is in the detailed findings below.

Inspection carried out on 21 July 2015

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 21 July 2015 and was unannounced.

Meadow Acres is a care home without nursing. It provides care, support and treatment for up to eight people with a learning disability. There were seven people accommodated at the home at the time of this inspection.

We last inspected the service on 14 August 2013 and found the service was meeting the required standards at that time.

The home had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

CQC is required to monitor the operation of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) and to report on what we find. DoLS are in place to protect people where they do not have capacity to make decisions and where it is considered necessary to restrict their freedom in some way, usually to protect themselves or others. At the time of the inspection we found that applications had been made to the local authority in relation to the people who lived at Meadow Acres.

People felt safe at Meadow Acres and were confident to approach the staff. People had health care and support plans in place to ensure staff knew how people liked their needs to be met. Risks to people’s safety and welfare had been identified and care had been planned to enable people to live as safely and independently as possible. There were sufficient numbers of staff available to meet people’s care and support needs. People’s medicines were managed safely.

Staff members understood their roles and responsibilities and were supported by the manager to maintain and develop their skills and knowledge. People enjoyed a varied healthy diet and their health needs were well catered for.

The atmosphere in the home was welcoming and there was a warm interaction between the staff and people who used the service. People were involved in all aspects of their care and support as much as they were able. People were supported to access support from external advocacy services to help them make decisions about matters in their daily lives. Relatives and friends were encouraged to visit at any time and people were actively supported to maintain family relationships. Staff promoted people’s dignity and treated them with respect.

People were supported to be individuals. Their care and support was planned around their needs and they, along with family members and professionals, were involved in decisions about their care. The provider had made arrangements to support people and their families to raise concerns and meetings were held for people to discuss all aspects of the care and support provided at the home.

The manager promoted a positive culture within the home that was transparent and inclusive. The manager and provider had robust systems to continuously check the quality of the service provided. Staff felt valued and were encouraged to contribute any ideas they may have for improving the service.

Inspection carried out on 14 August 2013

During a routine inspection

People told us that they liked living at the house and two people said, "We are a family". Another person said that there were lots of things to do each day and that, "The staff are friendly but can be very busy". Staff told us that it was a nice place to work and one person told us, "That it was very busy but always rewarding".

We saw that staff were always supporting the people who lived at the house and worked with people who had high needs. We observed that this was done with respect for people's privacy and dignity. We gained some feedback from a visiting professional who complimented the staff and the support they gave to people at all times. Parents and friends had complimented the service although one had said the house can be full of noise at times.

Inspection carried out on 4 September 2012

During a routine inspection

During our visit to Meadow Acres on 04 September 2012 six of the eight people who lived at the home were available for us to meet with. Because of the limited verbal communication of some of the people it was difficult to discuss their care with them in any depth. Therefore we also used a number of different methods including observations and talking with staff, to help us understand the experiences of these people.

People told us that they were well cared for and we noted that they were relaxed in the presence of the staff team. One person said, �I am very happy here, I don�t ever want to leave� and another person showed a thumbs up sign when we asked about the care the home and the staff who worked there provided.

People told us that they were supported to be independent and the staff helped them to carry out personal care and household tasks according to their needs and ability. One person said, �I can now go to the bank on my own and sometimes to the shops�.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)