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Inspection carried out on 31 October 2017

During a routine inspection

We carried out an unannounced inspection of Huyton Hey Manor on the 31st October 2017 and the 2 November 2017. The first visit was unannounced with the registered provider being aware of our second visit.

We last visited the service in December 2014. At that time the service was rated as good with no breaches of regulations identified. During that visit, we identified that the service was not always safe. This related to improvements that were needed to the environment. This visit found that these improvements had been done. People who used the service told us that the improvements made were better.

Huyton Hey Manor is a privately owned care home which provides accommodation for older people some of whom were living with dementia. The service accommodates up to 27 adults. The service is located in the Huyton area of Knowsley and is close to local public transport routes. Accommodation is provided over three floors. The majority of bedrooms are located on the first and second floor and these floors can be accessed via a passenger lift. At the time of our visit, 26 people were living there.

A registered manager was employed at the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People felt safe living at Huyton Hey Manor. This view was echoed by relatives we spoke with. Staff had had received training in how to protect vulnerable adults and were clear about how they could report any allegations of abuse. They were also clear about the agencies they could speak to if they had concerns about poor practice within the service.

The premises were well maintained, clean and hygienic. Equipment such as hoists, portable electrical appliances and fire extinguishers were regularly serviced to ensure that they were safe. Risk assessments were in place identifying any potential hazards within the environment that could pose a risk to people and how this risk could be prevented. Personal evacuation plans were also in place to ensure the safe evacuation of people in the event of a crisis.

Risk assessments were in place highlighting the risks people faced from pressure ulcers, weight loss and malnutrition. These were closely monitored and reviewed regularly.

Sufficient staff were on duty at all times of the day. Staff rotas, discussions with people who used the service, relatives and staff confirmed this. Staff recruitment was robust with checks in place to ensure that new members of staff were suitable people to support vulnerable adults.

Medication management was good and promoted the well-being and safety of people who used the service. Checks were in place to ensure that medication was given when needed and systems in place to ensure that supplies never ran out. People told us that they always received their medication when they needed it. Staff who administered medication received appropriate training and had their competency to do this task checked.

People and their families considered that staff knew what their role was and knew all aspects of people’s preferences and their daily needs.

Staff received training appropriate to their role. Staff received supervision to ensure that they were aware of their progress and to discuss any needs they had. Group supervision in the form of staff meetings also took place. Staff of longer standing received an annual appraisal of their work.

The registered provider had taken the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act into account. This included assessments on the degree of capacity people had, how limited capacity would impact on their daily lives and how decisions could be made in their best interest. Staff had received training in the Mental Capacity Act and understood the principles associated

Inspection carried out on 3 December 2014

During a routine inspection

We inspected the service on the 3 December 2014. This visit was unannounced.

Huyton Hey Manor is a privately owned care home which provides accommodation for up to 27 older people. The service is located in the Huyton area of Knowsley and is close to local public transport routes. Accommodation is provided over three floors. The majority of bedrooms are located on the first and second floor which can be accessed via a passenger lift.

During our previous inspection of the home in October 2013 we found that the service was meeting the regulations we assessed.

The registered manager had been in post since September 2014. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons.’ Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us that they felt safe living at the service. Staff knew how to keep people safe from abuse and were aware of how to report any concerns they may have in relation to safeguarding people from harm. We found that improvements were needed around the building to help ensure that people were safe.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is required by law to monitor the operation of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) and to report on what we find. Procedures were in place to promote people’s rights and the providers responsibilities in relation to the MCA 2005.

People told us that they enjoyed the food served and that they always had a choice.

Care planning documents and records were in place that detailed people’s needs in relation to their care and support. Staff showed that they knew people who used the service well and that they were aware of their likes and dislikes. We saw that staff supported people in a manner that was respectful and maintained their dignity.

Staff told us that they felt supported in their role. We saw that staff had the opportunity to attend training and that they were supervised on a regular basis.

Regular meetings were held so that people who used the service and their relatives were able to comment and contribute to what happens in the service.

The registered manager carried out regular checks around the home to help ensure that people were receiving the care and support they required. In addition, regular checks on people’s care plans and medicines took place.

Inspection carried out on 28 October 2013

During a routine inspection

People were admitted to the home following an assessment of their needs and an agreement that their needs could be met. They were given a contract of residence so they would know what their rights were.

We found that people who lacked capacity to make the best choices had their interests protected. Best interest decisions were made when people lacked capacity to choose for themselves.

People told us they were happy with the care and support they received from staff. They said, �I do discuss things with staff and I can decide what I want them to do to help me. I can�t walk very well. All the staff are very good really.� �I came to look around to see what I thought. The other home was closing. It was my decision to stay here I am well looked after, the staff are really good".

People said staff were attentive to their needs. We observed staff being polite, helpful and showed a caring nature when supporting people.

Activities were good and age appropriate.

People told us they were satisfied with the catering arrangements.

People lived in a safe environment. They said they were comfortable and had everything they needed.

People were cared for by staff that were of good character and had been recruited properly.

People were consulted in matters relating to their care and welfare.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)